How To 

How to Use Less Electricity



Power plant emissions are off the charts. As we incorporate more technology in our lives, we require more and more energy to keep our world powered. It might seem like a hopeless cause, but if everyone does their small part and reduces their energy consumption just a little bit, we can significantly reduce the global impact. Here’s what you can do to use less electricity in your home and your life:

1. Only run full loads.
Whether you’re washing dishes, clothes, or using the dryer, only do so when you have a full load to put in. Any less, and you’re using both water and electricity unnecessarily. If you desperately need a dish or have to wear a certain outfit, wash it by hand.

2. Use a power strip.
One of the most common tips you’ll hear about saving electricity is to unplug appliances you’re not using. This job becomes so much easier if you have several appliances connected to a power strip. Not only are power strips more energy efficient, they also make unplugging several electronics at once a cinch. These do come with a warning, though: don’t overload it or you could have a fire hazard on your hands.



3. Use energy efficient light bulbs.
“Traditional” incandescent lights should be a thing of the past in your household. Energy efficient bulbs work just as well, last six times longer, and use as much as 75% less energy. Think about how many light bulbs you have in your home, and that percentage becomes even more significant.

4. Ensure your home is properly insulated.
What’s the point of heating or cooling your home if all that air just leaks out anyway? Checking to make sure your home is properly insulated is not only good for the environment and reducing energy consumption, it’s also better for your wallet.



5. Hang clothes to dry in the summer.
Dryers are, for all intents and purposes, unnecessary. Sure they work relatively quickly, but what about the natural dryer that’s right outside your door? In the summer months when the sun is baking the earth, hang your clothes out to dry and use one of the only truly free resources in this world. As a bonus, your clothes will have that sweet summer scent that only comes from letting them dry in the breeze.
 
Dec 26, 2019
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How about we use Nicholas Tesla's technology where you have free energy from the current of the Earth. Oh well big petro can't make money on that so you won't see that happen unless people wise up and demand it.
 
Jan 1, 2020
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Carbon proliferates green plant vegetation growth. Taking carbon out of the atmosphere would result in the loss of vegetation. Thus oxygen would be less present which in turn heat the earth.
By logical analysis the carbon dioxide would not actually heat the earth at all. Ot would by cause /effect... cool it.
 
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Dec 26, 2019
218
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130
Carbon proliferates green plant vegetation growth. Taking carbon out of the atmosphere would result in the loss of vegetation. Thus oxygen would be less present which in turn heat the earth.
By logical analysis the carbon dioxide would not actually heat the earth at all. Ot would by cause /effect... cool it.
Try to tell the climate psychologist that.lol! We are just climate deniers to them.:rolleyes:
 
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Reactions: Conrad
Nov 26, 2019
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Power plant emissions are off the charts. As we incorporate more technology in our lives, we require more and more energy to keep our world powered. It might seem like a hopeless cause, but if everyone does their small part and reduces their energy consumption just a little bit, we can significantly reduce the global impact. Here’s what you can do to use less electricity in your home and your life:

1. Only run full loads.
Whether you’re washing dishes, clothes, or using the dryer, only do so when you have a full load to put in. Any less, and you’re using both water and electricity unnecessarily. If you desperately need a dish or have to wear a certain outfit, wash it by hand.

2. Use a power strip.
One of the most common tips you’ll hear about saving electricity is to unplug appliances you’re not using. This job becomes so much easier if you have several appliances connected to a power strip. Not only are power strips more energy efficient, they also make unplugging several electronics at once a cinch. These do come with a warning, though: don’t overload it or you could have a fire hazard on your hands.



3. Use energy efficient light bulbs.
“Traditional” incandescent lights should be a thing of the past in your household. Energy efficient bulbs work just as well, last six times longer, and use as much as 75% less energy. Think about how many light bulbs you have in your home, and that percentage becomes even more significant.

4. Ensure your home is properly insulated.
What’s the point of heating or cooling your home if all that air just leaks out anyway? Checking to make sure your home is properly insulated is not only good for the environment and reducing energy consumption, it’s also better for your wallet.



5. Hang clothes to dry in the summer.
Dryers are, for all intents and purposes, unnecessary. Sure they work relatively quickly, but what about the natural dryer that’s right outside your door? In the summer months when the sun is baking the earth, hang your clothes out to dry and use one of the only truly free resources in this world. As a bonus, your clothes will have that sweet summer scent that only comes from letting them dry in the breeze.
Energy efficient light bulbs do make a huge different - this I've noticed myself. As for washing clothes, I always do a full load. There are newer type washing machines now more water efficient as well as power. Clean much better than the conventional ones.
 
Jan 6, 2020
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I remember when they came out with low flow toilets using less water. Most times you have to flush twice or more to do the trick. I have never seen anyone dry clothes outside in the winter time up North look outside the window. Social engineering amuses me it is always one size fits all. Strange my left foot is slightly larger than my right foot.
 
Nov 26, 2019
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11
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I remember when they came out with low flow toilets using less water. Most times you have to flush twice or more to do the trick. I have never seen anyone dry clothes outside in the winter time up North look outside the window. Social engineering amuses me it is always one size fits all. Strange my left foot is slightly larger than my right foot.
Being in Australia, we do hang to dry out our clothes in winter time. If it's heavy with rain - no. If very overcast, windy &/or cold, yes. As for the left and right foot not being the same size, yes, most would fit that mould
 
Jan 6, 2020
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Point taken to make a cart blank statement to hang your clothes out in the sun for all to follow requires an assessment of what part of the world you are talking about. Most people make their opinions on the known world that they see around them, 360 degrees, and figure if they can do it so can the other 7 billions inhabitants of the world can do the same thing. There are too many variables involved.
 
May 12, 2020
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How about we use Nicholas Tesla's technology where you have free energy from the current of the Earth. Oh well, big petro can't make money on that so you won't see that happen unless people wise up and demand it.
 
Last edited:
Jan 4, 2020
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Power plant emissions are off the charts. As we incorporate more technology in our lives, we require more and more energy to keep our world powered. It might seem like a hopeless cause, but if everyone does their small part and reduces their energy consumption just a little bit, we can significantly reduce the global impact. Here’s what you can do to use less electricity in your home and your life:

1. Only run full loads.
Whether you’re washing dishes, clothes, or using the dryer, only do so when you have a full load to put in. Any less, and you’re using both water and electricity unnecessarily. If you desperately need a dish or have to wear a certain outfit, wash it by hand.

2. Use a power strip.
One of the most common tips you’ll hear about saving electricity is to unplug appliances you’re not using. This job becomes so much easier if you have several appliances connected to a power strip. Not only are power strips more energy efficient, they also make unplugging several electronics at once a cinch. These do come with a warning, though: don’t overload it or you could have a fire hazard on your hands.



3. Use energy efficient light bulbs.
“Traditional” incandescent lights should be a thing of the past in your household. Energy efficient bulbs work just as well, last six times longer, and use as much as 75% less energy. Think about how many light bulbs you have in your home, and that percentage becomes even more significant.

4. Ensure your home is properly insulated.
What’s the point of heating or cooling your home if all that air just leaks out anyway? Checking to make sure your home is properly insulated is not only good for the environment and reducing energy consumption, it’s also better for your wallet.



5. Hang clothes to dry in the summer.
Dryers are, for all intents and purposes, unnecessary. Sure they work relatively quickly, but what about the natural dryer that’s right outside your door? In the summer months when the sun is baking the earth, hang your clothes out to dry and use one of the only truly free resources in this world. As a bonus, your clothes will have that sweet summer scent that only comes from letting them dry in the breeze.
That's great if you have a yard, but we apartment dwellers are strictly forbidden to hang laundry outside. The idea takes me back 70 years,though, so thanks.
 

Wal

Dec 21, 2019
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Save money on your electric bill. if you have an electric water heater, add a timer! Mine turns off at 10 pm, on at 6 am, and never not had hot water. And save $20 month on electric bill ! Perhaps in cold climates might want to double up on your heater wrap.
 

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