What is the speed of light?

May 31, 2023
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That's correct. In a vacuum, such as outer space, light travels at a constant speed of approximately 299,792 kilometers per second (or about 186,282 miles per second), which is often rounded to 300,000 kilometers per second for simplicity. This speed is commonly referred to as the speed of light in a vacuum and is denoted by the symbol "c". However, when light passes through a medium, such as air, water, or glass, its speed can change. This change in speed is due to the interaction of light with the atoms or molecules in the medium. The speed of light in a medium is typically slower than its speed in a vacuum because the particles in the medium can absorb and re-emit photons, causing a delay in the overall propagation of light. The change in speed of light in different materials is characterized by the refractive index of the material. The refractive index indicates how much the speed of light is reduced when it passes through that particular material compared to its speed in a vacuum. It's worth noting that while light is the fastest known phenomenon in the universe, it is not instantaneous . what pickleball paddles do the prose use. It still takes time for light to travel from one point to another, and its speed is an essential aspect of many fundamental theories and principles in physics.
 
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Jun 1, 2023
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I thought the speed of an event was relative, with all observers having their own space time, therfore how does this fit into 2 observers seeing the same speed of light ?