The sky is full of weird X-shaped galaxies. Here's why.

Dec 8, 2019
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So not only are some scientists providing analogies that black holes eat, but now some other scientists would like us to believe that some black holes even burp, or belch out matter. And then they identify the belched matter as 'X' shaped galaxy. I believe these nonsensical analogies are actually distorting the layperson's understanding of black holes. I'm sorry, but black holes and all large gravitationally dense objects rotate. This is something else.
 
May 13, 2020
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Beautiful image from MeerKAT. FYI this is an hour glass shape, not two boomerangs. It is a common formation, commonly misinterpreted . It is more frequently noticed in plantary nebula but exists in the galactic scale as well. It is a plasma phenomenon that can be reproduced down here on earth.
 
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Mar 26, 2020
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The article is imprecise and ambiguous, talking about the black holes "belching" matter into space.
Is this matter coming from "inside" the black hole (which would be an astonishing finding that seemingly defies physics, going far beyond mere Hawking radiation), or from near the black hole/the accretion disc?
 
Dec 4, 2019
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@stephen J Bauer: "So not only are some scientists providing analogies that black holes eat, but now some other scientists would like us to believe that some black holes even burp, or belch out matter."

The words "belching" and "indigestion" are incredibly stupid ones to use in this situation, and does create confusion (or maybe the writer didn't understand the concept).

Supermassive blackholes are surrounded by a swirling disk of dust and gas called an accretion disk. This disk gets hotter as it gets close to the black holes event horizon (the distance from the gravitational center where the escape velocity equals the speed of light). The temperature of the accretion disk close to the event horizon is many times hotter than the surface of stars.

If a star strays close to the black hole, it can get shredded and suddenly a glut of material hits the accretion disk. When this material collides with the super heated disk, part of it erupts outwards at close to the speed of light, in narrow jets perpendicular to the plane of the accretion disk. These jets then collide with gas and dust, producing x-rays and radio waves.

So, no matter comes out from the event horizon of the black hole. From our current understanding of physics, nothing can. The matter, in this case, is blasted out from the accretion disk.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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Beautiful image from MeerKAT. FYI this is an hour glass shape, not two boomerangs. It is a common formation, commonly misinterpreted . It is more frequently noticed in plantary nebula but exists in the galactic scale as well. It is a plasma phenomenon that can be reproduced down here on earth.
Please explain the plasma processes that can create an hourglass shape at galactic scales. Things you can demonstrate at centimeter scales don't do well when you extrapolate them to galactic scales. You probably know that electromagnetic field falls off as 1/r^3, right?
 
May 5, 2020
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I'd call it 4 bursts, and assume a wobbling (precessing?) SMBH. The longest is the oldest; the "boomerang" is second oldest; the bright bulges just outside the galaxy is the 3rd oldest (second newest); and the white hourglass in the center is the newest. So, 4 stars eaten at 4 different times. (As the intergalactic medium is apparently sparse, it is unlikely to push back on anything. It may slow a burst over time, assuming merely cumulative inertial effects. But "pushback" would require massive magnetic field interactions or extremely long term gravitic pulling.)
 
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Dec 4, 2019
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Now you've asked the question you are sure to find the answer, hopefully this is not beneath you
Again, none of these things can even remotely explain a galactic scale hourglass shaped emission. Neither you, nor @Nick Wilmhurst have demonstrated anything close to what you claim can explain the observation. Like most charlatans, you both jump in and claim your pet "theory" can explain anything. However, when challenged, all you have are vague wikipedia articles and hilariously wrong YouTube videos. Typical.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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I'd call it 4 bursts, and assume a wobbling (precessing?) SMBH. The longest is the oldest; the "boomerang" is second oldest; the bright bulges just outside the galaxy is the 3rd oldest (second newest); and the white hourglass in the center is the newest. So, 4 stars eaten at 4 different times. (As the intergalactic medium is apparently sparse, it is unlikely to push back on anything. It may slow a burst over time, assuming merely cumulative inertial effects. But "pushback" would require massive magnetic field interactions or extremely long term gravitic pulling.)
Interesting idea. However, as I understand it, precession occurs when poles describe a circle on the surface of a sphere containing the field. As a black hole by definition has no surface. the precession needs to happen at a the event horizon level, with a strong, ordered magnetic field doing the "wobbling." If that is the case, this would be a SMBH equivalent of a magnetar. Interesting thought.
 
May 5, 2020
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Interesting idea. However, as I understand it, precession occurs when poles describe a circle on the surface of a sphere containing the field. As a black hole by definition has no surface. the precession needs to happen at a the event horizon level, with a strong, ordered magnetic field doing the "wobbling." If that is the case, this would be a SMBH equivalent of a magnetar. Interesting thought.
I thought of this when I noticed that the youngest burst is not aligned with the poles of the outlined galaxy nor perpendicular to the gap. And I thought it required less "mysterious forces" hypothesizing.
 
Jan 13, 2020
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Again, none of these things can even remotely explain a galactic scale hourglass shaped emission. Neither you, nor @Nick Wilmhurst have demonstrated anything close to what you claim can explain the observation. Like most charlatans, you both jump in and claim your pet "theory" can explain anything. However, when challenged, all you have are vague wikipedia articles and hilariously wrong YouTube videos. Typical.
I'm just a car mechanic mate, but if you liked that stuff you will just love Douglas B Vogt (the Torah/Toroid guy) or even take another look at Immanuel Velikovsky, unfortunately the global outcomes are/have been fairly catastrophic so it may well be a waste of time....https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjBe55XpYzc0HzkK-8lgQtA/videos
Don't leave it too long though, it's not too long before we might expect a disruptive burst from the sun.
Peace out. https://suspicious0bservers.org/
 
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May 13, 2020
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Please explain the plasma processes that can create an hourglass shape at galactic scales. Things you can demonstrate at centimeter scales don't do well when you extrapolate them to galactic scales. You probably know that electromagnetic field falls off as 1/r^3, right?
OK Ruined. I would be sorry for the late reply, but I wasn't looking for a reply. As I said "FYI". It is not up to me to explain to you what you can't see. I am fully aware how EM field power falls off. 1/r^3 is for an omnidirectional source of electromagnetic energy. The universe is not an omnidirectional em source. The universe is an infinite space filled with many things such as ionized atoms. An ionized atom doesn't care what the ionized atoms at the other side of a galaxy are doing. It need only sense what is beside it. This is directional and close. I don't have time to explain to you how this works to form a larger system with an hourglass shape. You will need to read the vague wikipedia article, then read more about the research done by the person it was about, then read about the research done by countless others. You will have to spend more time learning, and less time insulting people on the internet. You are the charlatan with the pet theory.
Do not reply to me.
 
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Mar 4, 2020
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When we take an image here on earth, all the pixels have the same time. An image of a star field.........has many points in time........millions of exposures.

Determining one exposure out of it will be difficult.

Astronomy is a guessing science. We guess how far. We guess how big. And we guess when.

But what we see, is not there at the same time. In actual time, the universe might be a lot less dense than what we see.

But......the further we look, the denser it gets. The number of far out galaxies is in-comprehensible. Wait until the Webb gets fired up. What do you think they will find?

Another paradox.
 

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