The 12 deadliest viruses on Earth

Mar 5, 2020
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Not sure where the name SARS-CoV-2 came from. The official WHO name is COVID-19.
 

Meh

Mar 5, 2020
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Not sure where the name SARS-CoV-2 came from. The official WHO name is COVID-19.
The name of the virus itself, free floating without having infected anyone is SARS-CoV-2 (there's also two strains of it, an S and and L strain). When someone is infected with SARS-CoV-2, the disease is called COVID-19. One is the name of the infectious particle, the other is the name of the disease.
 
Mar 5, 2020
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The name of the virus itself, free floating without having infected anyone is SARS-CoV-2 (there's also two strains of it, an S and and L strain). When someone is infected with SARS-CoV-2, the disease is called COVID-19. One is the name of the infectious particle, the other is the name of the disease.
Sorry - my mistake. You are correct. COVID-19 is the name of the illness and not the virus itself, and the article is about the viruses. Had I read more closely, my comment would have been "Not sure where the name SARS-CoV-2 came from. The official WHO name is 2019-nCoV ." I am new to all this. My background is engineering - not infectious organisms or diseases. Now having dug a little deeper, I see different groups seem to have different names for the same virus. I note that the WHO says COVID-19 is different from SARS. So that has me wondering why anyone would decide to use SARS in the name if a virus that does not (according to WHO at least) cause SARS.
 
Mar 6, 2020
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Sorry - my mistake. You are correct. COVID-19 is the name of the illness and not the virus itself, and the article is about the viruses. Had I read more closely, my comment would have been "Not sure where the name SARS-CoV-2 came from. The official WHO name is 2019-nCoV ." I am new to all this. My background is engineering - not infectious organisms or diseases. Now having dug a little deeper, I see different groups seem to have different names for the same virus. I note that the WHO says COVID-19 is different from SARS. So that has me wondering why anyone would decide to use SARS in the name if a virus that does not (according to WHO at least) cause SARS.
See here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-020-0695-z
" Thus, the reference to SARS in all these virus names (combined with the use of specific prefixes, suffixes and/or genome sequence IDs in public databases) acknowledges the phylogenetic (rather than clinical disease-based) grouping of the respective virus with the prototypic virus in that species (SARS-CoV). The CSG chose the name SARS-CoV-2 based on the established practice for naming viruses in this species and the relatively distant relationship of this virus to the prototype SARS-CoV in a species tree and the distance space"
 
Mar 6, 2020
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Comment on rabies fatality rate. The classic exposure /infection/terminology is difficult to employ when speaking about rabies. Although all warm-blooded animals are thought to be susceptible to rabies, there are strains of the rabies virus ( multiple bat stains ) strains are maintained in particular reservoir host(s), with some cross over especially in the US between raccoons and skunks. Although a strain can cause rabies in other species, the virus usually dies out during serial passage in species to which it is not adapted, and non-carnivores (cows, horses, deer, groundhogs, beavers ) AND CATS, like small rodents, are dead-end hosts. The CDC estimates in the US, 1 million dollars per potential life saved is spent by post-exposure prophylaxis in cases of exposure to animals other than bats, canines, fox, raccoon, skunks. At some point, the inability to PROVE this may be trumped by statistics; when I became a veterinarian in 1975, PEP was still recommended for squirrel and gerbil bites. Hundreds of (unvaccinated) cats are infected with, and die ( or are euthanized) of rabies each year -no way every human exposure to "the kitten in the park " is tracked down. Certainly, many farmers and ranchers are unknowingly exposed. Yet almost all of the 6-9 people diagnosed in the US yearly, knew they were bitten by a dog (when outside the US) or handled a bat. And there have been several incidences since 2000, where people got rabies secondary to solid organ transplants. This had been thought only a risk when transplanting 'nerve' tissue (corneas), I wonder if this reflects better and/or different immunosuppressive drugs in recipients.

Species vary in susceptibility to various strains, humans are 'most' susceptible to canine rabies and, in the US, the silver-haired bat strain. This is a solitary bat with infrequent human interaction, whereas we have much more exposure to big and little brown bats and Mexican free-tailed bats. (Only a small percentage of any of these have rabies, -it kills them too!)

The virus needs to get to a nerve, so if a bite is not deep enough, or a small viral load is deposited, or the 'victim' immune system responds - an infection will never be established. If the virus is able to get to a nerve, it attempts to travel up an axon, to the brain- again, the immune system may eliminate. As rabies is a slow virus, it can self -immunize, explaining the presence of rabies neutralizing antibodies in Amazonian Indians and others who have never been vaccinated? (The reason why a mature dog is considered immunized 28 days after its first rabies vaccination, is if it has been exposed or is 'incubating' rabies virus but the virus is more than 28 days away the vaccine will prevent infection. Although antiglobulin is given, PEP - a killed vaccine, is basically, rapid immunization. I am pulling this from memory but I believe in cases where multiple people were bitten by a rabid dog, in 15% infection was established. Once the the virus is in the brain and /or clinical signs are seen, then it is almost always, fatal. Since definitive diagnosis is made on brain biopsy, the apparent spontaneous cures or response to treatment remain unproven.

Not to diminish the threat or the misery of this disease. I don't understand why the WHO estimate of deaths has been quoted as 35,000 to 55,000 for the last 40 years - while the world population went from approximately 4 billion to 8 billion, mostly in Africa and Asia where few dogs are vaccinated and most cases are seen.
 
Mar 7, 2020
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Humans have been fighting viruses throughout history. Here are the 12 viruses that are the world's worst killers, based on their mortality rates, or the sheer numbers of people they have killed.

... on COVID-19 origin

"The virus likely originated in bats, like SARS-CoV, and passed through an intermediate animal before infecting people. "
...
dear admin, i don't see solid evidence and facts that this new strain of virus originated from Bats, passing thru animals, then to human. Should we sample and study the Bats or animal carcasses for more evidence? Even the latest chinese scientists from Wuhan flip to suggest that other sources is potential. Indonesia market for example has high appetite for Bats as food.

It seems that humans are passing the virus to dogs and cats now. also, it is well known there is a P4 virus lab located nearby the Wuhan market. my question - is there any regulations that governs the building of such dangerous lab so close to the mass human neighbourhood?
 
Mar 18, 2020
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See here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-020-0695-z
" Thus, the reference to SARS in all these virus names (combined with the use of specific prefixes, suffixes and/or genome sequence IDs in public databases) acknowledges the phylogenetic (rather than clinical disease-based) grouping of the respective virus with the prototypic virus in that species (SARS-CoV). The CSG chose the name SARS-CoV-2 based on the established practice for naming viruses in this species and the relatively distant relationship of this virus to the prototype SARS-CoV in a species tree and the distance space"
And in any case, the World Health Organization (WHO) is not the naming authority for novel viruses — this is the job of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) and in this case specifically the Coronaviridae Study Group (CSG, or ICTV-CSG) which concluded that the virus that causes COVID-19 should be named SARS-CoV-2

The WHO on the other hand is the naming authority for novel diseases, and the name 2019-nCoV for the virus causing COVID-19 was only of a provisional nature, signifying a novel coronavirus discovered in 2019. Official classification of viruses is a scientific process, where the degree of relatedness (of novel viruses to those previously identified) is considered. By actually comparing the genome of the novel coronavirus to the genomes of related viruses, looking at certain replicative proteins, it was clear that SARS-CoV (causing SARS) and SARS-CoV-2 (causing COVID-19) are quite close to each other genetically, even though nothing indicates that the latter is a direct descendent of the former. Both are also much more closely related to other coronaviruses, known to infect Asian and African bats respectively. In contrast, none of them are as closely related to MERS-CoV as they are to each other. On the other hand, these three are more closely related to each other, than any of them are to the other coronaviruses known to infect humans. The three previously discussed (causing major epidemics in recent decades) are zoonotic viruses, meaning they are believed to momentarily “spill over” from animals to humans. The other four coronaviruses infecting humans are common respiratory viruses that circulate continually among us, with symptoms ranging from the common cold (which can be caused by more than 200 virus strains) to more high-morbidity outcomes
 
Mar 21, 2020
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it tells you that first was sars 1 that came from bats and hopped into a nocturnal mammal called videts then sars 2 or covid 19 which also came from bats and possibly hopped into other mammals like The Pangolin that has a 99% identical match to the virus. then the sars 3 they al are a family of Coronaviruses.
 
Apr 17, 2020
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Humans have been fighting viruses throughout history. Here are the 12 viruses that are the world's worst killers, based on their mortality rates, or the sheer numbers of people they have killed.

The 12 deadliest viruses on Earth : Read more
Why do you omit & ignore Hepatitis?
Hepatitis in various versions are prevalent & deadly, especially HCV. Even among USA:
  • Since 2012, there have been more deaths due to hepatitis C than all 60 of the other reportable infectious diseases combined.
Where's the concern & shutdown? Likely more that I could pick apart your article, but this omission was egregious & easy. People are suffering & dying from injuries & illness while neglected appropriate treatment & truth suppressed from exposure while a blatant ruse promoted with misinforming propaganda, fraud, & deliberate misdiagnoses, then exploited by individual & systemic corruption.
 
May 6, 2020
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See here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-020-0695-z
" Thus, the reference to SARS in all these virus names (combined with the use of specific prefixes, suffixes and/or genome sequence IDs in public databases) acknowledges the phylogenetic (rather than clinical disease-based) grouping of the respective virus with the prototypic virus in that species (SARS-CoV). The CSG chose the name SARS-CoV-2 based on the established practice for naming viruses in this species and the relatively distant relationship of this virus to the prototype SARS-CoV in a species tree and the distance space"
Was the Virus started by someone eating a bat?
 
May 9, 2020
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"Humans have been battling viruses since before our species had even evolved into its modern form. For some viral diseases, vaccines and antiviral drugs have allowed us to keep infections from spreading widely, and have helped sick people recover."

This is misleading information! You talk about evolution then modern medicines as if natural medicinal herbs never existed.. why?? Modern medicine never existed within 100 years.. So why don't you explained how humans survived millions of years ago with out the used of VACCINES and DRUGS? **mic drop**
 
May 23, 2020
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It appears a list of 10 viruses were intentionally increased to 12 viruses just to include coronaviruses. How is the danger or how deadly a virus is determined?
 
May 23, 2020
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Is it still correct to call this virus SARS-CoV-2 when it mainly attacks blood vessels and is mainly responsible for microthromboses, which cause strokes, heart attacks, etc.? From one source I learned that this virus apparently contains HIV/Ebola genome. This mutation may have occurred in a person infected with this disease(s).
 

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