Can people spread coronavirus after they recover?

Mar 4, 2020
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I am no scientiest but what i have briefly researched in 18 minutes was that the organization of the coronavirus genome i viewed in a jpeg and i have and question at the end. So the Coronavirus virus particles contain four main structural proteins. These are the spike (S), membrane (M), envelope (E), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, all of which are encoded within the 3′ end of the viral genome i viewed. To successfully initiate an infection, viruses need to overcome the cell membrane barrier. Enveloped viruses achieve this by membrane fusion, a process mediated by specialized viral fusion proteins
The S protein (∼150 kDa), utilizes an N-terminal signal sequence to gain access to the ER, and is heavily N-linked glycosylated. Homotrimers of the virus encoded S protein make up the distinctive spike structure on the surface of the virus. The trimeric S glycoprotein is a class I fusion protein and mediates attachment to the host receptors.
So can we use stem cells to create proteins as we kill off the original proteins that are injected with the virus to counter act its offensive objective and thats to over come the membrane barrier?
Can we use stem cells?
 
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Mar 6, 2020
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I am no scientiest but what i have briefly researched in 18 minutes was that the organization of the coronavirus genome i viewed in a jpeg and i have and question at the end. So the Coronavirus virus particles contain four main structural proteins. These are the spike (S), membrane (M), envelope (E), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, all of which are encoded within the 3′ end of the viral genome i viewed. To successfully initiate an infection, viruses need to overcome the cell membrane barrier. Enveloped viruses achieve this by membrane fusion, a process mediated by specialized viral fusion proteins
The S protein (∼150 kDa), utilizes an N-terminal signal sequence to gain access to the ER, and is heavily N-linked glycosylated. Homotrimers of the virus encoded S protein make up the distinctive spike structure on the surface of the virus. The trimeric S glycoprotein is a class I fusion protein and mediates attachment to the host receptors.
So can we use stem cells to create proteins as we kill off the original proteins that are injected with the virus to counter act its offensive objective and thats to over come the membrane barrier?
Can we use stem cells?
You were in right!
 
Mar 9, 2020
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I am no scientiest but what i have briefly researched in 18 minutes was that the organization of the coronavirus genome i viewed in a jpeg and i have and question at the end. So the Coronavirus virus particles contain four main structural proteins. These are the spike (S), membrane (M), envelope (E), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, all of which are encoded within the 3′ end of the viral genome i viewed. To successfully initiate an infection, viruses need to overcome the cell membrane barrier. Enveloped viruses achieve this by membrane fusion, a process mediated by specialized viral fusion proteins
The S protein (∼150 kDa), utilizes an N-terminal signal sequence to gain access to the ER, and is heavily N-linked glycosylated. Homotrimers of the virus encoded S protein make up the distinctive spike structure on the surface of the virus. The trimeric S glycoprotein is a class I fusion protein and mediates attachment to the host receptors.
So can we use stem cells to create proteins as we kill off the original proteins that are injected with the virus to counter act its offensive objective and thats to over come the membrane barrier?
Can we use stem cells?
Some still think that the virus may enter cells by endocytosis.
 
Mar 15, 2020
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Have read a couple of research papers (eff. Jan 2020) and some are referring to SARS-COv-2 as being bi-phasic. First round low mortality rate.....second round....high mortality rate due to it being an RNA virus and being able to reassort its genomic expression to adapt.
 
Mar 15, 2020
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Some still think that the virus may enter cells by endocytosis.
Because the viral spike glycoprotein (S) utilizes angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a host protein receptor I would think it prudent to consider using an ACE2 inhibitor like Monteleukast or Symbicort to prevent the virus spike from binding to the host receptor.
 
Mar 15, 2020
25
17
55
I am no scientiest but what i have briefly researched in 18 minutes was that the organization of the coronavirus genome i viewed in a jpeg and i have and question at the end. So the Coronavirus virus particles contain four main structural proteins. These are the spike (S), membrane (M), envelope (E), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, all of which are encoded within the 3′ end of the viral genome i viewed. To successfully initiate an infection, viruses need to overcome the cell membrane barrier. Enveloped viruses achieve this by membrane fusion, a process mediated by specialized viral fusion proteins
The S protein (∼150 kDa), utilizes an N-terminal signal sequence to gain access to the ER, and is heavily N-linked glycosylated. Homotrimers of the virus encoded S protein make up the distinctive spike structure on the surface of the virus. The trimeric S glycoprotein is a class I fusion protein and mediates attachment to the host receptors.
So can we use stem cells to create proteins as we kill off the original proteins that are injected with the virus to counter act its offensive objective and thats to over come the membrane barrier?
Can we use stem cells?
Read this: https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/42954531/903.pdf?response-content-disposition=inline; filename=Structure-based_discovery_of_a_novel_ang.pdf&X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Credential=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A/20200317/us-east-1/s3/aws4_request&X-Amz-Date=20200317T152913Z&X-Amz-Expires=3600&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Signature=17e8f95ac2ac07430543c7f598e7e50b9e3c6b2062185c93005f6c36ba8a02c4
 
Mar 20, 2020
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Because the viral spike glycoprotein (S) utilizes angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a host protein receptor I would think it prudent to consider using an ACE2 inhibitor like Monteleukast or Symbicort to prevent the virus spike from binding to the host receptor.
Neither Monteleukast or Symbicort are ACE2 inhibitors. Ikarugamycin and Molsidomine are examples of ACE2 inhibitors.
 

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