Why COVID-19 kills some people and spares others. Here's what scientists are finding.

May 6, 2020
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The novel coronavirus causing COVID-19 seems to hit some people harder than others, with some people experiencing just mild symptoms and others being hospitalized and requiring ventilation. Here's why.

Why COVID-19 kills some people and spares others. Here's what scientists are finding. : Read more
Ok, I will bite. How does 80% (8 out of 10) = 11% + 27% (38%) ?

"About 8 out of 10 deaths associated with COVID-19 in the U.S. have occurred in adults ages 65 and older, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The risk of dying from the infection, and the likelihood of requiring hospitalization or intensive medical care, increases significantly with age. For instance, adults ages 65-84 make up an estimated 4-11% of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S, while adults ages 85 and above make up 10-27%. "
 
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May 6, 2020
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Ok, I will bite. How does 80% (8 out of 10) = 11% + 27% (38%) ?

"About 8 out of 10 deaths associated with COVID-19 in the U.S. have occurred in adults ages 65 and older, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The risk of dying from the infection, and the likelihood of requiring hospitalization or intensive medical care, increases significantly with age. For instance, adults ages 65-84 make up an estimated 4-11% of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S, while adults ages 85 and above make up 10-27%. "
I see that the writer pulled the stats directly from CDC website but misunderstood them. I believe the last two percentages is the percentage of confirmed cases for the age group that ended in death due to the virus, not the percentage of overall deaths. Livescience needs to vet their articles better else they become yet another source of misinformation.
 
Jun 6, 2020
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To reiterate and add a link.

They have misquoted CDC. See this: See below for estimated percent of adults with confirmed COVID-19 reported in the U.S:

If most of the confirmed cases are 65+ then the math can work out.
 
Mar 24, 2020
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From the article: "These influences could explain why some perfectly healthy 20-year-old with the disease is in dire straits, while an older 70-year-old dodges the need for critical interventions. " Nothing in this article explained why some 20's get real sick and 70's don't except for a vague reference that blood type or genetics might be a factor.. This article contained nothing new.. Stuff I've already read a thousand times..
 
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Jun 13, 2020
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In addition to the flat-out wrong percentages already mentioned, "Though scientists at first thought age was the dominant factor..." is radically misleading. It has been extremely well borne out that age is the dominant factor associated with risk, as the CDC stats make clear: https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Provisional-COVID-19-Death-Counts-by-Sex-Age-and-S/9bhg-hcku/data . As noted in https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.21.20108969v1 , completely uncontrolled diabetes gives one the vulnerability of someone approximately 10 years older than they are, as does a BMI above 40; using the figures in the article about blood type, having type A is equivalent to 3 years' risk (95% confidence interval 1 year to 6 years). A far cry from age not being the dominant factor!
 
Jun 22, 2020
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here in NY the areas which have fared worst have higher levels of air pollution resulting in asthma and a diet high in processed food (higher obesity rate and victims of the diabetes epidemic), so this pandemic has brought greater awareness to modifying to a more healthy diet as well as switching to renewables for better air quality. Cuomo showed during one of his pressers that a survey taken by local hospitalizations showed that pre-existing conditions was the major underlying factor behind hospitalizations, 96% Being outside or even working in the healthcare field was much less of an indicator.
 
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Jul 14, 2020
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Ok, I will bite. How does 80% (8 out of 10) = 11% + 27% (38%) ?

"About 8 out of 10 deaths associated with COVID-19 in the U.S. have occurred in adults ages 65 and older, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The risk of dying from the infection, and the likelihood of requiring hospitalization or intensive medical care, increases significantly with age. For instance, adults ages 65-84 make up an estimated 4-11% of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S, while adults ages 85 and above make up 10-27%. "
I think the article got the statistics from an article similar to this one:

As of March 16, a total of 4,226 COVID-19 cases in the United States had been reported to CDC, with multiple cases reported among older adults living in long-term care facilities (4). Overall, 31% of cases, 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of ICU admissions, and 80% of deaths associated with COVID-19 were among adults aged ≥65 years with the highest percentage of severe outcomes among persons aged ≥85 years.
The same article has
This first preliminary description of outcomes among patients with COVID-19 in the United States indicates that fatality was highest in persons aged ≥85, ranging from 10% to 27%, followed by 3% to 11% among persons aged 65–84 years, 1% to 3% among persons aged 55-64 years, <1% among persons aged 20–54 years, and no fatalities among persons aged ≤19 years.
Further on,
Among 44 cases with known outcome, 15 (34%) deaths were reported among adults aged ≥85 years, 20 (46%) among adults aged 65–84 years, and nine (20%) among adults aged 20–64 years. Case-fatality percentages increased with increasing age, from no deaths reported among persons aged ≤19 years to highest percentages (10%–27%) among adults aged ≥85 years (Table) (Figure 2).
This explains there methodology:
The lower bound of these percentages was estimated by using all cases within each age group as denominators. The corresponding upper bound of these percentages was estimated by using only cases with known information on each outcome as denominators.
10% - 27% and 3% - 11% are based on reported age, while 34% and 46% (80%) seem to be based on known outcome. These were from 4,226 COVID-19 cases that state and CDC confirmed back in March; the data was missing'/incomplete.

It seems they are using different sampling criteria for each.
 
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Jul 7, 2020
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The novel coronavirus causing COVID-19 seems to hit some people harder than others, with some people experiencing just mild symptoms and others being hospitalized and requiring ventilation. Here's why.

Why COVID-19 kills some people and spares others. Here's what scientists are finding. : Read more
The numbers on "people over 65" are misleading and dangerous. Many people in that age group have comorbidities and many live in nursing homes or other environments where they can't escape close contact from others. When you separate out nursing home occupancy and comorbidities, the age differences vanish. Immunosenescence varies widely among people over 65 and appears very low among people who are physically fit. I discuss this at length with references in my article http://mycopy.info/agemed

Mexico never saw older people at extreme risk. In that country, comorbidities occur at all ages and few nursing homes exist.

This is ageism, pure and simple.One geriatrician (quoted in my article) says a fit person who's 80 has a better chance of surviving than a 60yo with underlying conditions. .
 

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