Planets more hospitable to life than Earth may already have been discovered

Jan 24, 2020
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'Planets more hospitable to life than Earth'

Absolutely not possible. Not, short of a few billion years of evolution.
 
Oct 10, 2020
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'Planets more hospitable to life than Earth'

Absolutely not possible. Not, short of a few billion years of evolution.
So what makes you think that billions of years of evolut
'Planets more hospitable to life than Earth'

Absolutely not possible. Not, short of a few billion years of evolution.
So what makes you think that billions of years of evolution haven't been taking place all along?
 
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Jan 16, 2020
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So far, no evidence of life has been found on any of these "wonderful" planets, and our modern technology pretty much prohibits us travelling to even the closest. We haven't even made it to the closest planet in our solar system, but it would probably be a lot cheaper to build permanent settlements on the moon and Mars than it would be to reach a planet that is hundreds of years of travel time away. There are a lot of science fiction stories describing landing on new 'Earth-like' planets, and many tell of unforeseen diseases or other catastrophes that tend to wipe out the settlers. Every one of those stories is at least as plausible as any plan we have developed to reach and colonize these distant planets.
 
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Aug 20, 2020
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'Planets more hospitable to life than Earth'

Absolutely not possible. Not, short of a few billion years of evolution.
Interesting science - now when are any of them going to comment on such as myself who has stood 20ft from two 'starling-like chirruping' blues as you call them. Plus walked along a road with a grassy verge - with one 7ft-8ft? tall totally cloaked individual keeping step with me on a country tractor roadway in central Schleswig-Holstein - grass compressed with each footstep imprint ~15" long. AND THAT is only a start as six of us witnessed a craft disappear in a flash after two had crossed the night sky from south to north as fast as you could turn you're head and just one stopped dead in an instant before racing off at speed. When worldwide these reports come in any numbskulls?? ignore them...................!!!
 
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Oct 9, 2020
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So far, no evidence of life has been found on any of these "wonderful" planets, and our modern technology pretty much prohibits us travelling to even the closest. We haven't even made it to the closest planet in our solar system, but it would probably be a lot cheaper to build permanent settlements on the moon and Mars than it would be to reach a planet that is hundreds of years of travel time away. There are a lot of science fiction stories describing landing on new 'Earth-like' planets, and many tell of unforeseen diseases or other catastrophes that tend to wipe out the settlers. Every one of those stories is at least as plausible as any plan we have developed to reach and colonize these distant planets.
Yeah, it's fun to fantasize about going to other planets but, I think we should prioritize fixing this planet.
 
Jan 3, 2020
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Pity summary of the paper: "In fact, only Kepler 1126 b (KOI 2162) and Kepler-69c (KOI 172.02) are statistically validated planets (Morton et al., 2016). The other objects are unconfirmed Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), some of which may turn out to be astrophysical false positives. …
Our point here is not to identify potential targets for followup observations but to illustrate that superhabitable worlds may already be among the planets that have been detected."

Superhabitability has been a research area since a few years back. I guess the field of astrobiology needs more convincing of the usefulness of the concept.
 
Jan 3, 2020
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So far, no evidence of life has been found on any of these "wonderful" planets, and our modern technology pretty much prohibits us travelling to even the closest.
If you include Earth, we have an example, and the goal of astrobiology science is to find more life. The article describes ongoing work, and that is all there is to it in a young science that will need decades of work by people that have a more realistic view of nature. Processes rarely produce just one system or object, that would take finetuning, so there is no obvious merit in the argument when we still have too weak instruments to do a good test.

And which astrobiologist has ever asked for traveling to extrasolar systems or claimed that it would improve research? We don't even know that we can ever travel there - to quote "fairy tales" and "science fiction"* - but we know we can start the research now (since it has started) and that the next generation of instruments that are coming up during this decade will likely do a good enough job. Faster, cheaper and above all feasible science.

*If I had one wish when reading about science outside the solar system is that asking for 'traveling there' and 'fix Earth instead' would go out of fashion, Such pipe dreams may motivate paying for science but they don't motivate the science at hand** - science that will at large give us economical returns at about 20:1 on investment (which, when you think of it, should be motivation enough - it is among the best investments out there).

** Though there is of course the useful argument that improving astronomical instruments is helping "fix the planet" when used for geoscience from orbit (or closer). Part of the 20:1 returns that is immediately apparent.
 
Oct 11, 2020
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So wait a minute. Does the article say that they have allready discovered 4.000 exo planets and none of them has been proved so far that is habitable? Are you serious? What does tha make the earth then? I mean 1 in 4.000 ? Is that uniqueness , isnt that allready a that a very very rare spawn ? Isnt that singularity?

This number should allready make the scientists suspcisious, sceptical, and dubious about the possible findings of a Habitable planet. What does a habitable planet means exactly?
Habitability of a planet is directly connected with "life". The assumptions that life is allready out there is based purely on a statistical assumption and nothing else.Statistical aspirations like (more is more, likely to happen) and not based on any scientific facts.
Statitics is a form of science of course. A science that many many times has been proved wrong. And its never ever 100% accurate.

Let me break the bad news for you. There will never ever be found a "habitable" planet out there.
Why cant we finally accept that the creation of life, like big bang can be a unique moment in the history of the universe?
 
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Aug 20, 2020
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'Planets more hospitable to life than Earth'

Absolutely not possible. Not, short of a few billion years of evolution.
Absolutely not possible is a very negative terminology. 15,000,000,000 years in which tomato soup could have been invented many times over... Plus present parallelism alongside ourselves brings up some more interesting existences to ponder upon...... Amazing Cosmos..... Very inept sciences... Wonder why US Navy worried about a few aliens and their supper-duper UFO's - are they also really inept scardie-cats, or just dumbnuts???
 
Mar 3, 2020
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At least two dozen planets outside the solar system might be better for life than Earth.

Planets more hospitable to life than Earth may already have been discovered : Read more
Why do astrobiologists keep on assuming that there are other planets that might be conducive to life, when in fact, they have found none that even remotely fits the requirements for life as the earth does ? They continue to conjecture of the possibility for life to exist elsewhere, but have no hard data to support their "belief", just further hypothesis.

Here is where an ancient proverb comes into play, that says: "Like clouds and wind that bring no rain, is a man who boasts about a gift (of proving that there is material life elsewhere or that other planets meet all the critical requirements) never given".(Prov 25:14 in the Bible) And what are some of the critical requirements for material life to exist ?

(1) the temperature has to be "just right" or in the "comfort zone", not extreme, such as what we find on the earth, (2) and for the temperature to be "just right" requires a precise distance from the sun, which is 93 million miles, for just five percent closer and the earth would not be able to sustain life, being too hot, and one percent farther away and the earth would be a frozen wasteland (3) the exact size of the earth, for if the earth were just slightly larger, hydrogen, a light gas, would not escape at the proper prescribed rate, being held on ground level, rendering earth to become a dead zone, and if the earth were just slightly smaller, surface water and oxygen would escape the earth's gravitational force, leaving us "high and dry" so that life would be snuffed out, and thus for a planet to sustain life as we see on the earth requires a precise and delicate balance not found anywhere else.

(4) a planet has to have an atmosphere that has the precise proportion of oxygen (21 percent of the atmosphere for humans, animals and other organisms to breathe as the Hebrew word nephesh designates that literally means "breather" at Genesis 2 in the Bible) to nitrogen (78 percent of the atmosphere for plants to grow by means of a nitrogen cycle through certain bacteria, in which if there is none, root systems and plant growth is stunted, causing photosynthesis and life to cease and also provides a "safety net" of inert gas against sudden outbreaks of fire due to high concentrations of oxygen) to carbon dioxide (about 0.4 percent for plants to extract the carbon and release the oxygen for "breathers" to breathe) to begin with.

Just as a modern car is composed of about of about 30 thousand "pieces", and each must exactly fit precisely together as "one" for the car to function well, or otherwise, there are "problems", so of the earth, but its precision far exceeds that of a modern automobile, for it is our "home" in the cosmos, that must keep "on ticking" exactly as it is or life would cease.

Any deviation and astrobiologists run into serious problems or the anthropic principle. Over thirty years ago, astronomer John Barrow and mathematician Frank Tipler studied “the ratio of the Earth’s radius and distance from the Sun.” They concluded that human life would not exist “were this ratio slightly different from what it is observed to be.”

Professor David L. Block (elected a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of London at age 19) notes: “Calculations show that had the earth been situated only 5 per cent closer to the sun, a runaway greenhouse effect [overheating of the earth] would have occurred about 4 000 million years ago. If, on the other hand, the earth were placed only 1 per cent further from the sun, runaway glaciation [huge sheets of ice covering much of the globe] would have occurred some 2 000 million years ago.”(Our Universe: Accident or Design ? pub in 1993)

Try changing the precise measurements of a modern automobile, and see if it will even run.
 
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Jul 27, 2020
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Quoting from the article:

"The researchers came up with a set of parameters to use to meet all these criteria. According to these parameters, the perfect superhabitable planet would be......about 5 billion to 8 billion years old; about 10% larger than Earth."

Venus lost its geodynamo shortly after forming, allowing nearly a complete loss of water from a lack of a solar-shielding magnetic field. It has been a barren world for billions of years, yet the article notes that "the perfect superhabitable planet would be......about 5 billion to 8 billion years old."

Like Venus, Earth will also lose its geodynamo once it cools down enough - probably some billions of years from now (unless the moon is helping to keep it hot by tidal forces).

The most likely reason it has not yet been lost is due to the impact that formed the moon. This impact probably provided much more molten iron-nickel alloy to the earth's core (from the impacting differentiated "minor planet"), prolonging its geodynamo for billions of years. Note that Venus has no moon, and also no magnetic field.

None of the assessments for a "perfect superhabitable planet" take into account this essential aspect of a planet's interior, one vital to maintaining an atmosphere, and preventing terminal water loss by photo-dissociation.

Old planets that might look habitable likely are not for this very reason.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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"a larger planet would also have higher gravity, which would make for a thicker atmosphere, something that could be beneficial for organisms that travel by flight, the researchers wrote."

Just what we need is more and bigger mosquitoes.

According to some other articles written regarding spaceflight, that with a slightly larger earth, say 10%, it would be impossible to have spaceflight. We could not develop a rocket which could attain escape velocity on a larger planet. So there goes space exploration and thus the exploration of our other local planets and moons . These have been of great interest to me and many others but we would be just stuck on the ground, like a rock. Learning about the universe, such as we have through the Hubble telescope, would not be possible either since it could not have been launched. I would not call that a more ideal planet.

Article also mentions a benefit of a closer or larger moon as a stabilizing influence. Our moon was once closer and is still steadily receding due to an interchange of tidal forces. The price of transferring earth's rotational energy to the moon is to slow our rotational velocity. We had much shorter days then, perhaps as low as 8 hours. So similarly, a larger or closer moon won't stay that way around another planet. You might say we already had our billions of years with a closer moon, and whatever benefits it might have provided during such a period.

I agree with some others, you won't ever find an earth-like planet. Partly because we will never be able to get there and partly because it will be increasingly reinforced that such does not exist.
 

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