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Famous World War I Battleship Discovered at the Bottom of the Atlantic

Dec 6, 2019
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The wreck of one of the most famous German warships of World War I has been located on the seafloor near the Falkland Islands, where it sank in a battle with British warships more than 100 years ago.

Famous World War I Battleship Discovered at the Bottom of the Atlantic : Read more
Sadly, the ship in question was not a 'Battle Cruiser' but instead the far less speedy and powerful Armored Cruiser. Battle Cruisers were under armored but well armed fast post dreadnought designs while armored cruisers were smaller, slower, and far less armed obsolete designs. Just as an aircraft carrier is not a submarine, an armored cruiser is not a battle cruiser nor is it (as labeled in the headline) a 'battleship.
 
Feb 23, 2020
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The original term back the was "Dreadnought" from the first British battleship although the terms became interchangeable. I have gotten tired of every warship today being called a "battleship" including those with little to no armor and nothing bigger than a 5" gun! Battleships were rulers of the sea for years until aircraft came along and the Pearl Harbor/Prince of Wales & Repulse sinkings showed the way of the future.
 
Jan 27, 2020
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There is one remaining dreadnought in the US, the USS Texas (BB-35), the sister ship of the USS New York (BB-34).

The USS Texas was launched on 18 May 1912 and commissioned on 12 March 1914.

Soon after her commissioning, Texas saw action in Mexican waters following the famous "Tampico Incident" and made numerous sorties into the North Sea during WWI, while based in England.

When the United States formally entered WWII on December 8, 1941, following the Japanese surprise air attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, Texas escorted Allied convoys across the North Atlantic and later shelled German held beaches in the Invasion of Normandy, France on June 6, 1944, before being transferred to the Pacific in late in 1944 to provide gunfire support during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Texas was decommissioned in 1948, having earned a total of five battle stars in World War II. The USS Texas (BB-35) is now a museum ship near Houston, Texas.

Texas is the only remaining World War I–era dreadnought battleship, as noted by her midships twin 14" turret. She is also noteworthy for being one of only seven remaining battleships and the only remaining capital ship to have served in both World Wars.
 
Jan 27, 2020
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I did history at school -hated it

History is what we, collectively, were and who we are today. To understand the background of any aspect of today's news you must understand history. I happened to love reading about all kinds of history. I think that the enjoyment of history goes hand in hand with the parental support of reading and reading what you enjoy. Without enjoyment, there is little to promote reading and history.

I have a personal affinity with the USS Texas. My father served on the USS New York, her sister ship while she was assigned to convoy duty during the dark days of WWII before he got his own ship. He always referred to the New York as the "Old New Yorker."

My wife and I toured the USS Texas (BB-35) after my dad passed away. It was somewhat emotional to walk those similar decks my father trod during the storms and the heavy seas the North Atlantic is famous for.

While Great Britain ruled the waves as late as WWI, by the end of WWII, the US Navy, with its two ocean fleets, possessed almost 1,200 surface combatants and was pre-eminent on the seas. Additionally, there were over 2,000 amphibious ships designed to place troops on contested shores.
 
Jan 27, 2020
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The original term back the was "Dreadnought" from the first British battleship although the terms became interchangeable. I have gotten tired of every warship today being called a "battleship" including those with little to no armor and nothing bigger than a 5" gun! Battleships were rulers of the sea for years until aircraft came along and the Pearl Harbor/Prince of Wales & Repulse sinkings showed the way of the future.

The Battle of the Coral Sea (April 29-May 8, 1942) was the first major U.S. Navy fleet action against Japan and the first naval engagement in history in which the participating ships never sighted or fired directly at each other.

Although the attacks between two U.S. Navy task forces and a combined U.S.Australian cruiser force with the Japanese Carrier Strike Force and supporting units resulted in a Japanese tactical victory, where the US Navy lost the big deck carrier USS Lexington (CV-2), a destroyer and an oiler, the Japanese were forced to withdraw from the operational area after losing a light carrier (IJN Shoho) and suffered serious damage to a fleet carrier (IJN Shokaku), which prevented her from taking part in the Midway attack. However, with their air groups too battered to support a further advance, the Japanese were brought to a standstill, and both sides limped home.

The USS Yorktown was damaged in The Coral Sea by Japanese bombing and limped to Pearl Harbor where emergency repairs were completed to enable the carrier {the sister ship of the USS Enterprise (CV-6) "The Big E", and the USS Hornet (CV-8)} to take part in The Battle of Midway, June 4-7, 1942. Although the Yorktown was lost at Midway, she assisted US naval units in decisively defeating the Imperial Japanese Navy and placing them on the defensive for the remainder of WWII.
 
Jan 1, 2020
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History is what we, collectively, were and who we are today. To understand the background of any aspect of today's news you must understand history. I happened to love reading about all kinds of history. I think that the enjoyment of history goes hand in hand with the parental support of reading and reading what you enjoy. Without enjoyment, there is little to promote reading and history.

I have a personal affinity with the USS Texas. My father served on the USS New York, her sister ship while she was assigned to convoy duty during the dark days of WWII before he got his own ship. He always referred to the New York as the "Old New Yorker."

My wife and I toured the USS Texas (BB-35) after my dad passed away. It was somewhat emotional to walk those similar decks my father trod during the storms and the heavy seas the North Atlantic is famous for.

While Great Britain ruled the waves as late as WWI, by the end of WWII, the US Navy, with its two ocean fleets, possessed almost 1,200 surface combatants and was pre-eminent on the seas. Additionally, there were over 2,000 amphibious ships designed to place troops on contested shores.
Yes I understand that now & my views & attitudes ave changed but this was when I was at school
 

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