Earth’s core and climate change

Jun 12, 2021
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I read the article on Earth’s core growing, which is stated to be the result of cooling of the inner core. Heat does not disappear it transfers to another source which is described as the outer core. Could this heat be transferring to the earth’s crust and then the atmosphere adding to warming of the earth and climate change. There has been increased volcanic activity which also transfers heat to the earth surface. It is time to start making this relationship to climate change.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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The earth does not need the sun to stay warm. It only needs the sun to grow plants. If we took the earth and put in deep space, all alone, the planet earth would continue to be warm. One can dig down anywhere on this planet....and hit ~50 degrees F. And the deeper you dig, the warmer it gets. Plus, this planet is saturated with hot pressurized water. So, even all alone in deep space, we have temp and water. Drilling down and releasing this water to atmosphere will warm the surface for life to continue. But the plant life needs sunlight, to support all the other life.

If we were knocked out of orbit, all of our energy would have to be diverted into light and CO2, for the plants.

According to past records, the normal CO2 levels are about 1500 ppm for this planet. The past ~40 million years of low CO2 levels are a fluke, and possibly limiting the plant life. Man's activity might be saving this planet.
 
Aug 4, 2021
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The latest evidence of the role humans play in changing Earth's climate comes not from observations of the ocean, atmosphere or land surface, but from Earth's molten core. ... Instead, they're due to the flow of liquid iron within Earth's outer core, where Earth's magnetic field originates.

liteblue
 
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Mar 4, 2020
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Kinda shows you the power of evaporation. The world's oceans, kept at ~33 degrees, in a +50 degree cradle.

Our center regions might move and deform, but I doubt any excess heat will come.

The dynamics that happen in the center, are not following the gravity laws that we are use to.

There might be a lighter gravity in the center. Maybe causing a very long duration, slow velocity, inner circulation. Circulation of in and out, not rotation. I doubt we'll ever know.
 
Sep 6, 2020
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According to past records, the normal CO2 levels are about 1500 ppm for this planet. The past ~40 million years of low CO2 levels are a fluke, and possibly limiting the plant life. Man's activity might be saving this planet.
I have this source and part quote "The global average atmospheric carbon dioxide in 2019 was 409.8 parts per million (ppm for short), with a range of uncertainty of plus or minus 0.1 ppm. Carbon dioxide levels today are higher than at any point in at least the past 800,000 years. "


Looking further back, there is no evidence of your claims on 1500ppm which can only be taken as made up to reinforce your incorrect position.
Part quote from this link-

"The 66 million-year geologic story shows an overall trend of gradual, naturally declining CO2 over tens of millions of years, concluding in the geologically recent ice ages. Crucially, this history also reveals the extreme, unnatural, skyrocketing rise in CO2 levels over the last 150 years. "

 

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