Will COVID-19 die down in summer? New tests could help answer that.

Mar 25, 2020
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Is it a change of seasons that may affect things? I'm curious because they have numerous confirmed cases south of the equator, where countries have opposite seasons of ours; so they just went from summer into fall recently, and the virus seems active in those hotter conditions.
 
Mar 27, 2020
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If Covid-19 can come down in summer why wait for summer. The common hair dryer can also produce the same temparature of around 60-70 degree centigrade.
 
Mar 27, 2020
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If Covid-19 can come down in summer why wait for summer. The common hair dryer can also produce the same temparature of around 60-70 degree centigrade.
Because first of all, that's not how it works, and second, unless you plan on severely burning your sinus passages, trachea, lungs and alveoli, you aren't going to accomplish anything.
 
Mar 27, 2020
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Is it a change of seasons that may affect things? I'm curious because they have numerous confirmed cases south of the equator, where countries have opposite seasons of ours; so they just went from summer into fall recently, and the virus seems active in those hotter conditions.
No.
 
Mar 27, 2020
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This experiment completely misunderstands the issue of transmission vectors and how they are affected by temperature.
Aerosolizaton and droplet size and spread at different temperatures have literally nothing to do with increased transmission.
Respiratory viruses spread more readily in colder months because the viruses rely on the body's response to cold as a transmission vector. Mucous membranes, relative to skin, are much more susceptible to freezing as the temperature drops. To counter this, these membranes, such as that line the nose, mouth, and throat, secrete liquids: saliva, mucous, etc., to increase surface energy and thus decrease rate of freezing of tissues. This is why your nose runs in the cold, regardless of whether or not you are sick. It runs to prevent your sinuses from freezing solid, and thus dying.
Viruses capitalize on this by riding the waves of mucous out of their current host and into another. Likewise, they reply on the need to wipe these secretions away to hitch a ride on hands and other surfaces to move to a new host.
For viruses that rely on these mechanisms, cold weather increases transmission rate, not due to the physical properties of the droplets, but the physiological response of the body itself.
 
Mar 28, 2020
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This experiment completely misunderstands the issue of transmission vectors and how they are affected by temperature.
Aerosolizaton and droplet size and spread at different temperatures have literally nothing to do with increased transmission.
Respiratory viruses spread more readily in colder months because the viruses rely on the body's response to cold as a transmission vector. Mucous membranes, relative to skin, are much more susceptible to freezing as the temperature drops. To counter this, these membranes, such as that line the nose, mouth, and throat, secrete liquids: saliva, mucous, etc., to increase surface energy and thus decrease rate of freezing of tissues. This is why your nose runs in the cold, regardless of whether or not you are sick. It runs to prevent your sinuses from freezing solid, and thus dying.
Viruses capitalize on this by riding the waves of mucous out of their current host and into another. Likewise, they reply on the need to wipe these secretions away to hitch a ride on hands and other surfaces to move to a new host.
For viruses that rely on these mechanisms, cold weather increases transmission rate, not due to the physical properties of the droplets, but the physiological response of the body itself.
Recently read a study on Dramatic 2015 excess mortality in Italy a 9.1 increase that needs to be explained. Now the numbers on the report almost mirror the numbers infection mortality rate that are coming out of Italy recently. Could there be any correlation between the two, as far as undetected previous outbreaks of Covid19 in parts of Italy. The report specifically refer to north Italy as most affected which from my understanding thats the region most affected in the current epidemic.
 
Apr 3, 2020
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Is it a change of seasons that may affect things? I'm curious because they have numerous confirmed cases south of the equator, where countries have opposite seasons of ours; so they just went from summer into fall recently, and the virus seems active in those hotter conditions.
Very valid question. Because here in the Philippines is almost always summer these days, really warm. But this fact has not prevented the COVID from spreading here. And isn't Italy a summery place and yet has the highest mortality rate from COVID.
 
Apr 3, 2020
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Because first of all, that's not how it works, and second, unless you plan on severely burning your sinus passages, trachea, lungs and alveoli, you aren't going to accomplish anything.
I think the point she is trying to make is that maybe we can create the same temperature requirement to destroy the virus via artificial way (e.g. increase radiator temperature) that is when and if the medical experts do find out if environmental temperatures can weaken the integral structures of these microscopic demons enough to kill them.
 

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