Where does the energy of earthquakes come from????

Dec 12, 2020
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Academic Book Publishers www.elivapress.com
has released my book called Entertaining Geophysics.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1636482856. In the book I described the current state of the science of Geophysics and outlined my vision of the problems facing this science, as well as in the form of lectures for high school students explained the process of the origin of seismic energy. It would be interesting to discuss with colleagues the problems raised in this book.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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I would take a wild guess and say that any underground dynamic has it's roots in heat.

Even if plates weren't moving, I'll bet we would still have earthquakes and volcanoes. Probably less, but there is still plenty going on down in there. We've only went down a short piece.....and it was very high temp, saturated with super heated water and very high pressure.

A most excellent clean energy resource. Installation is a little high.

I believe our science has greatly under estimated the amount of water in this planet.

Why does it cost 60 bucks for a 130 page paperback?
 
Dec 12, 2020
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The roots of every phenomenon are in energy. No energy, no event.
Why the publisher put such a price on my book I do not know, they did not consult me. They probably consider the information in the book to be priceless.
 
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Dec 12, 2020
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Earthquakes occur when energy stored in elastically strained rocks is suddenly released. This release of energy causes intense ground shaking in the area near the source of the earthquake and sends waves of elastic energy, called seismic waves, throughout the Earth.
It's all about the fact that the mountain mass cannot store energy of elastic deformation. This contradicts the fundamental laws of physics and mechanics. Read at least this:https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3898821, https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3498647
Thank you for your attention.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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I have no knowledge of geologic principles. But what surprised me about deep bore holes, was the saturation of high pressure super heated water. That pressurized water will find and work on any defect of the restriction. As it seeps up....if it hits a low pressure/density area, it will flash.

Could this be the birth of a tremor? After a number of tremors, a less dense larger area, might invite a large quantity, very quickly to flash, giving a quake.

The flashes or flash, might even induce the slippage. This are wild guesses.

But all of that energized water needs to be accounted for, with the interior dynamics.
 
Dec 12, 2020
40
3
55
I have no knowledge of geologic principles. But what surprised me about deep bore holes, was the saturation of high pressure super heated water. That pressurized water will find and work on any defect of the restriction. As it seeps up....if it hits a low pressure/density area, it will flash.

Could this be the birth of a tremor? After a number of tremors, a less dense larger area, might invite a large quantity, very quickly to flash, giving a quake.

The flashes or flash, might even induce the slippage. This are wild guesses.

But all of that energized water needs to be accounted for, with the interior dynamics.
Any liquid in the depths of the Earth's rocks in the form of magma, water solutions, oil, etc. has the ability to generate hydraulic shocks, which by their enormous energy can easily cause an earthquake. Read this work of mine: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3464643
Thanks
 
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