What activities are "okay" to do during COVID-19 pandemic?

Mar 18, 2020
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I understand that this would depend on location. I am in Toronto, Ontario (Canada), but if you have information specific to a different area feel free to share, as others may be in need of it (just remember to indicate the location you are talking about).

I'm 24 and living with my parents and two siblings at the moment, and I am responsible for taking the family dog on one of her three daily walks (she is a large dog and we don't have outdoor space for her, so walking her, regardless of how the pandemic evolves, will always be necessary and non-negotiable, at least as far as I can think...correct me if I'm wrong), so I am guaranteed to be out for about 30 minutes each day to walk her. However, with the exception of that, what is "okay" to do right now? Just for context, last I checked the province of Ontario had 189 confirmed cases (183 active cases, 5 recovered, and one death). It seems that almost all of those cases are in southern Ontario. I can't find official numbers on how many of those cases are in Toronto. According to CityNews Toronto, 92% of cases in Ontario are related to either travel outside of the country (29% of those being from the United States) or close contact with another confirmed case. There are some cases with mode of transmission listed as "pending," meaning that as of right now, there is no known travel history or close-contact case to explain where it came from. All public schools in Ontario have been closed for two weeks (three weeks if you include this week's spring break). Additionally, effective today (March 17th) the City of Toronto has ordered the closure of all private schools, licensed childcare centres and cinemas, and dining in restaurants/bars is also prohibited (take-out and delivery is still allowed).

The situation here seems to have shifted very quickly and I am not entirely sure what is safe to do and what isn't. I know that given my age and the fact that I have no preexisting health conditions, I am at low risk, so my question is mostly in regards to my risk of contracting the virus in any way (even in the case of it being asymptomatic) and therefore spreading it to others. I know that I personally will likely be okay through this entire thing, I just don't want to be responsible for the loss of another person's life. I went out to get a coffee today (takeout of course- again, dining in is prohibited) and I already feel guilty. I won't be doing that again- I can live without Starbucks- but I just want to know, as for other activities, where should I draw the line? Again, walking the dog is necessary, and of course I will likely need to go out and restock on food at some point, but with the exception of those two things, should I stay home at all costs, or are certain low-contact activities (going for an hour long walk, visiting a young and healthy close friend/relative, etc.) okay?

Just to be clear, from now on I will always try to stay on the safe side and will not doing anything that I am unsure of. I just want to know other's people's thoughts and opinions, as well.
 
Mar 18, 2020
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A long walk outdoors should be fine, so long as you practice social distancing (staying at least six feet away from another person). I read online this morning that visiting friends and relatives (or having them visit you), even if all of you are or seem healthy, is NOT advised, because you can’t know if one of you may have encountered the virus (at some point from somewhere or someone) and be carrying it, as some people are asymptomatic. I also read that it’s best to prepare your own food. As I type this, a sub sandwich chain is running a BOGO promotion on footlongs, and I was tempted to place an order for pickup – but then I thought: I won’t be inside the store watching the person making our sandwiches – and what if the sandwich-maker isn’t wearing a mask and rubber gloves and s/he sneezes or something while making them, and their germs get on my food? Best to err on the side of caution. And don’t believe that wearing a face mask will do you no good. If that was truly the case, then why are all health professionals wearing them now? They tell us that only infected people should wear them to keep from infecting others – but if the masks can keep the infected droplets from getting out, then they can also keep them from getting in – or at least seriously reduce the chances; that’s just common sense.
 
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