Weird 'gravitational molecules' could orbit black holes like electrons swirling around atoms

Jul 12, 2020
7
2
35
Fields, as they might be defined operationally, were not used for 'centuries' before the mid-twentieth century; perhaps a little over one century. They were properly qualified (by Dedekind) less than a century before.
 
Jan 3, 2020
152
11
605
Interesting, since scalar field particles seems to be the remaining possibility with the exclusion of WIMPs (in LHC, ACME and Fermi-LAT to the Griest-Kamionkowski bound). Axions were proposed to solve matter/antimatter symmetry and already neutrinos promise (at a measly 2 sigma, but still) to solve that. The paper notes that:

Light scalar fields are interesting solutions to some of the most pressing problems in physics. One example is the dark matter problem.
[But it also dabbles in hypotheses that are mostly rejected and unnecessary to boot:

It is tempting to introduce fields with a scale (the Compton wavelength) similar to the size of galactic cores. One would thus be dealing with fields of mass 10^−21 eV or similar, in what is known as fuzzy dark matter models [43, 44].
More massive and clumpy CDM dark matter is observed, and the cusp-core problem that fuzzy dark matter was supposed to solve has been better solved by CDM and baryon physics since 2015 [ https://astrobites.org/2015/06/12/the-labor-of-outflows-against-dark-matter-halo/ ].]

The authors don't seem to say why they look at binaries, but I assume they wanted to look for imprints in gravitational wave behavior during mergers. The field variation is amplitude modulated by the binary rotation but essentially and for isolated or well separated black holes is resonating at the scalar mass. We'll see - they do think

compact binaries are a fertile ground to new phenomenology.
👹:

electrons can appear only in certain regions around an atomic nucleus
There is a non-zero likelihood for an lower-most energy s orbital electron to be located at the nucleus center - but I get your point.
 
Jan 3, 2020
152
11
605
Fields, as they might be defined operationally, were not used for 'centuries' before the mid-twentieth century; perhaps a little over one century. They were properly qualified (by Dedekind) less than a century before.
Aren't you describing the unrelated mathematical "field" concept, where Dedekind (1831 – 1916) worked on ring theory especially?

The physical field was introduced by Faraday (starting in 1831 as a fact!), made explicit 1845 and formalized by Maxwell 1864 [ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Faraday#Electricity_and_magnetism , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday's_law_of_induction , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory ]. Modern quantum field theory had to await Einstein's relativity and quantum discoveries, of course - it was developed starting in 1925.
 
Jan 3, 2020
152
11
605
In atomic physics, you can completely describe an elementary particle (like an electron) in terms of three numbers: its mass, its spin and its electric charge. And in gravitational physics, you can completely describe a black hole in terms of three numbers: its mass, its spin and its electron charge.

Coincidence? The jury's out on that one,
I don't get that implication!?

Black holes have thermodynamics (temperature and entropy) so are systems with microstates and notably continuous mass, spin and electric charge, elementary particles are microstates and have discrete (internal) mass, spin and electric charge - for gravity you should have gravitons with zero mass and electric charge but spin=2.

Aren't black holes more analogous with critical points of phases, where the mean field theory of an nearly ideal gas breaks down?
 
Nov 18, 2020
1
0
10
Is it possible that the hydrogen atoms are so compressed in the gravitational field of black holes that it actually achieves metallic form, holds that form long enough create the conditions for the metallic form to grow and thicken to a point where the existence of the so-called "worm hole" effect actually achieves sustainability? Noting the X Rays emitted from the center of the Milky Way as by products of the churn and spin in the center of the hole, what other explanations for the phenomena indicate the possibility? As nothing seems to be able to be detected from a lateral view of a black hole, an incredibly thick and dense wall of metallic hydrogen, not usually seen elsewhere, could be a source of inquiry into the nature of their gravitational being.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS