Turning C02 into Methanol

Jan 6, 2020
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Scientist have figured out a way to turn Co2 emissions into methanol by using a photocatalyst particle (Cu2O) that is photocatalytically active for CO2 and reducing it to methanol. The process oxidizes water as it reduces the particulate CO2. The results are surprising reducing CO2 to methanol with the use of the Cu2O crystals at 72 per cent.
This process would eliminate the need for the production of windfarms that are detrimental to wildlife birds etc. Methanol is a clean burning fuel that can be harnessed without taking up acres of land to produce electricity from windmills.
Wind turbines at 1.5 kwh at capacity only produce electricity around 40 percent of the time. 60 percent of the time they produce nothing due to little winds, maintenance or shutdowns.
Solar panels at best only convert 15 percent of the sun into electricity.
Both windfarms and solar panels require a redundant system to be sustainable. It would be cleaner and economically sustainable to convert CO2 into methanol to burn.
America instituted recent policies to fund the planting of more trees around the world is a step in the right direction.
 
Jan 6, 2020
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Europe uses 3 percent methanol as a gasoline additive. Environmental harm ask Europe apparently it is clean burning plus it is a high grade alcohol. It burns clean leaves no residue.
 
May 6, 2020
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The use of such catalysts are interesting and presumably any commercial systems that would be derived from this system would be set up much like a solar panel. The problem with it is efficiency. As pointed out by Ront5353, solar panels are highly efficient at about 15% conversion of incoming solar radiation directly into electricity. This is actually pretty efficient and about 3 times more efficient than plant conversion of solar energy into a combustible molecule which in turn is converted into electricity (2 part conversion for plants compared to solar panels). By contrast, the reduction of CO2 to methanol via light has a top efficiency of between 5-6% according to the latest research. Then converting from methanol to electricity is traditionally only about 20% efficient although recent developments in combustible engines have shown efficiency as high as 35%. So realistically, it is about a fifth as efficient as solar panels. In any case, it does seem to have potential and more importantly comes with a number of potential positives. The important thing here is this is early tech and if it is cheap to construct, than despite the likelihood it will ever come close to being as efficient as solar, it certainly something to consider.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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I am hopeful of a future where the use of the proper frequency and phase, should easily decompose any molecule. We need fast switches. And new mixing techniques.

And with a lot less energy than the bonding energy. The right rate and the right angle, along with the right time of induction should do it.

I believe that chemistry will be done with terahertz electronics in the future.

About solar.......I worked for a remote monitoring and control systems company that networked solar powered links all over the world. Many thousands of links in this country alone. These links were installed all over.....some in cities and a lot at very remote locations.

Each link had a line of site radio link and each site had a sat-link. And where available, a hard line phone link also. But city units were solar powered too....all units for reliability.

These solar powered stations were extremely reliable. Bullet holes, rutting buffalo, snow pac, eagles nest, knocked over and down in the dirt, we always had power. That was twenty years ago.

For a residence or small farm/business, solar power is great. If independence and reliability is your goal.

Can one even imagine, the global warming caused by a hydrogen powered car? Many times more "destructive" than CO2.

Solar-electrics for cars is the way to go. Light weight, dense storage is needed.

Perhaps a metal foam. Sooner or later something will be found.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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The use of such catalysts are interesting and presumably any commercial systems that would be derived from this system would be set up much like a solar panel. The problem with it is efficiency. As pointed out by Ront5353, solar panels are highly efficient at about 15% conversion of incoming solar radiation directly into electricity. This is actually pretty efficient and about 3 times more efficient than plant conversion of solar energy into a combustible molecule which in turn is converted into electricity (2 part conversion for plants compared to solar panels). By contrast, the reduction of CO2 to methanol via light has a top efficiency of between 5-6% according to the latest research. Then converting from methanol to electricity is traditionally only about 20% efficient although recent developments in combustible engines have shown efficiency as high as 35%. So realistically, it is about a fifth as efficient as solar panels. In any case, it does seem to have potential and more importantly comes with a number of potential positives. The important thing here is this is early tech and if it is cheap to construct, than despite the likelihood it will ever come close to being as efficient as solar, it certainly something to consider.
Methanol? We are already converting vegetation (sugarcane and other 'biomass'). And it is taking over land for agriculture we can eat into ethanol to be combined with 90% of fossil fuels. And then immediately sold and burned in our vehicles. The same is true for beer, wine and spirits, even carbonated sodas. The problem of course is we should not use any of it...store it if the goal is to keep atmospheric CO2 from rising. And don't forget those solar panel 'farmers' are also out to take over the land being used for our agriculture. Not a very well thought out plan?
 

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