The universe's clock might have bigger ticks than we imagine

Jul 15, 2020
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Chronon time loops.

When we try to observe a quantum event at a point in time, we encounter the uncertainty principal in that at a precise point in time, the exact state is uncertain (and vice-versa).
This is famously illustrated by Schrodinger's cat and extrapolated into the multiple worlds / parallel universes model.
I.e. if the quantum 'trigger' can be in any/every of a multitude of states at that precise point in time, then it can be thought as if it is in all of the states at once but in multiple parallel universes.
I hate this idea.

Perhaps 'a point in time' is not actually a single point but a loop of the smallest possible unit of time - a chronon. Hence a chronon time loop.
So the passage of time is a series of over-lapping ovals, like a chain or a sequence of joined-up lower case 'e's.
I.e. time doesn't just go straight forward, but it goes something like 2 steps forward and one step back.

Our conscious perception has been shown to actually lag behind real-time events by a fraction of a second.
Of course we don't notice this because it's a constant. Like watching a TV program via satellite - we never notice that we're seeing it a couple of seconds after it was transmitted because every instant of it is observed in the same sequence that it occurred, albeit not actually when it occurred.

Perhaps we can only observe the beginning part of the time loop but the actual event itself 'occurs' throughout the time loop.
While we are observing the event at only the initial part of the time loop, we will observe that the state is unknown because the event has not yet finished it's passage through the time loop. Thus we cannot know or see the outcome.
At some point in the future, the consequence of that event will be known - perhaps the cat died. In which case we will know what the exact status of the quantum trigger must have been.
Perhaps this retrospective is happening as feedback in the time loop.
So that at the final part of the time loop, the event has happened and the outcome is feedback through the time loop to nail down what the exact quantum state should be at the initial part of the time loop.

In this scenario, there is only one universe with only one time-line. And the state of the quantum trigger that threatens the cat is only uncertain to our incomplete observation, having been determined conclusively by the eventual outcome.
 
Jan 3, 2020
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The problem with discrete time is that it doesn't work relativistically, we can't have "preferred" reference frames, and it is generally accepted that relativity says space and time is continuous on all scales. Rather, the scale problem comes when you use the reconciliation of general relativity and quantum field theory that we have - linearized gravity quantum field theory [ http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Quantum_gravity_as_a_low_energy_effective_field_theory ]. You can't describe stuff on energy density scales higher than Planck energy density.
 
Jan 3, 2020
160
12
605
Chronon time loops.

When we try to observe a quantum event at a point in time, we encounter the uncertainty principal in that at a precise point in time, the exact state is uncertain (and vice-versa).
This is famously illustrated by Schrodinger's cat ....
I'm not sure how quantum uncertainty would affect time even if we have to observe it through clocks. See my other comment for a quantum field theory of gravity that physicists agree work for low energies.

In general quantum superposition, which is what Schrodinger's cat illustrates, as well as quantum entanglement, depends on non-locality (and no hidden variables) of quantum correlations. I don't have a problem with that, since relativity enforces light cone locality in order to have causality but quantum physics opens up as much non-locality of correlations it can have. It is an exact balance and is made explicit in quantum field theory which obeys relativity - I would be much more worried if we didn't have a quantum field theory for gravity that applies for relativity of space and time [see my other comment].
 

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