The emerging space technology

bearnard1616

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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
 
Nov 12, 2020
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The fact that space technologies are being developed and being proliferated bodes well for progress here on Earth for better human living conditions and possibly life sustaining resource preservation. As for space travel and extraterrestrial colonization, in my opinion at this time period and for a maybe a century, "we can't get there from here"; from technology, but mostly from physiology and psychology considerations. I would relish being wrong.
 
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bearnard1616

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The fact that space technologies are being developed and being proliferated bodes well for progress here on Earth for better human living conditions and possibly life sustaining resource preservation. As for space travel and extraterrestrial colonization, in my opinion at this time period and for a maybe a century, "we can't get there from here"; from technology, but mostly from physiology and psychology considerations. I would relish being wrong.
Actually I like the idea how satellite and microsatellite technology are developing. Especially, I like microsatellites and how useful they are. They can be used for different purposes like tracking rare species of animals and observing mountains and glaciers from space. Unfortunately, microsatellites don`t have rather long term of usage but their launch is much cheaper and I guess they will be enough developed soon
 

bearnard1616

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And also, I wanna add that some private space company manufactures those satellites and other great space equipment and spacecrafts like Skylark Micro rocket which is made for microgravity missions an experimants and also can take those microsatellites on the orbit.
 
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Actually I like the idea how satellite and microsatellite technology are developing. Especially, I like microsatellites and how useful they are. They can be used for different purposes like tracking rare species of animals and observing mountains and glaciers from space. Unfortunately, microsatellites don`t have rather long term of usage but their launch is much cheaper and I guess they will be enough developed soon
And also, I wanna add that some private space company manufactures those satellites and other great space equipment and spacecrafts like Skylark Micro rocket which is made for microgravity missions an experimants and also can take those microsatellites on the orbit.

As I said back in February, there are increasing problems with the proliferation of micro-satellites in Earth orbit...


"Call me crazy, but I'm worried about the increasing number of "things" in orbit because of my interest in astrophysics, astrophotography, and deep space exploration, both of which require lengthy amounts of clear viewing time for all types of Earth-bound telescopes. Additionally, even the LIGO gravitational wave experiments may be impacted from the electronic noise generated by the sheer numbers of these small satellites whizzing by overhead.

Apart from SpaceX, its rival company OneWeb has also expressed its intent to launch hundreds of its own satellites into space. Like Starlink, OneWeb’s satellites also aim to provide internet service from space.

With thousands of satellites about to launch into space, experts are worried about what would happen if these break down, tumble uncontrollably or burn up in re-entry. Eventually, these tiny spacecraft will end up as so much additional orbiting junk around Earth.

"If things break in space, it's pretty difficult to solve that problem," Tim Farrar, the president of the satellite communications research and consulting firm TMF Associates, told NPR. "It's not like your car breaking down on the side of the road with AAA available to give you a hand."

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are about 900,000 pieces of space junk smaller than 10 centimeters in low-Earth orbit. If companies continue to deploy their own satellites into space, this number could soon reach a million or more.

As previous reports have shown, the overcrowding in Earth’s vicinity has become a serious problem. In the autumn of 2019, one of SpaceX’s Starlink units almost collided with an ESA satellite. This fender-bender was avoided after the latter decided to fire up its thrusters to move out of the way.

More recently, the highly touted Satellite Constellations 1 Workshop Report from August of 2020, explained that: Existing and planned large constellations of bright satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEOsats) will fundamentally change astronomical observing at optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Nighttime images without the passage of a Sun-illuminated satellite will no longer be the norm. If the 100,000 or more LEOsats proposed by many companies and many governments are deployed, no combination of mitigations can fully avoid the impacts of the satellite trails on the science programs of current and planned ground-based optical-NIR astronomy facilities."
 
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bearnard1616

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As I said back in February, there are increasing problems with the proliferation of micro-satellites in Earth orbit...


"Call me crazy, but I'm worried about the increasing number of "things" in orbit because of my interest in astrophysics, astrophotography, and deep space exploration, both of which require lengthy amounts of clear viewing time for all types of Earth-bound telescopes. Additionally, even the LIGO gravitational wave experiments may be impacted from the electronic noise generated by the sheer numbers of these small satellites whizzing by overhead.

Apart from SpaceX, its rival company OneWeb has also expressed its intent to launch hundreds of its own satellites into space. Like Starlink, OneWeb’s satellites also aim to provide internet service from space.

With thousands of satellites about to launch into space, experts are worried about what would happen if these break down, tumble uncontrollably or burn up in re-entry. Eventually, these tiny spacecraft will end up as so much additional orbiting junk around Earth.

"If things break in space, it's pretty difficult to solve that problem," Tim Farrar, the president of the satellite communications research and consulting firm TMF Associates, told NPR. "It's not like your car breaking down on the side of the road with AAA available to give you a hand."

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are about 900,000 pieces of space junk smaller than 10 centimeters in low-Earth orbit. If companies continue to deploy their own satellites into space, this number could soon reach a million or more.

As previous reports have shown, the overcrowding in Earth’s vicinity has become a serious problem. In the autumn of 2019, one of SpaceX’s Starlink units almost collided with an ESA satellite. This fender-bender was avoided after the latter decided to fire up its thrusters to move out of the way.

More recently, the highly touted Satellite Constellations 1 Workshop Report from August of 2020, explained that: Existing and planned large constellations of bright satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEOsats) will fundamentally change astronomical observing at optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Nighttime images without the passage of a Sun-illuminated satellite will no longer be the norm. If the 100,000 or more LEOsats proposed by many companies and many governments are deployed, no combination of mitigations can fully avoid the impacts of the satellite trails on the science programs of current and planned ground-based optical-NIR astronomy facilities."
I can agree with you that microsats enhance the number of space junk in the Earth's orbit. However, these microsatellites are very efficient in different areas. I have already mentioned in another thread the importance of the usage of these microsatellites. They can be used to observe the land and to track rare species of animals to prevent them from being killed by poachers.
 
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I can agree with you that microsats enhance the number of space junk in the Earth's orbit. However, these microsatellites are very efficient in different areas. I have already mentioned in another thread the importance of the usage of these microsatellites. They can be used to observe the land and to track rare species of animals to prevent them from being killed by poachers.
You must perform a cost/benefit analysis on the micro/sats comparing their positives with the negatives the micro/sats create with Earth-bound observations of the universe which will be impacted to a greater degree with every new tranche of micro/sats launched. So far there have been amazing observations made at the very edge of the universe which require ever more lengthy observation times due to their distance. It is this observation time and the corresponding science, which is directly impacted by the light streaks caused by passing micro/sats due to the long term open apertures.

Could nearly invisible drones, either conventionally powered or solar powered for longer duration flights, in the lower atmosphere be better used to track poachers and their prey of rare animal species, and the other uses the micro/sats than Earth circling satellites leaving repetitive light trails?

drones.jpg
Long duration, 30 plus hour, drone.

solar drones.jpg
Solar drone.

I grow weary of pure science always taking a back seat because we, the large corporations serving us, cannot think outside the proverbial box.
Hartmann352
 
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Jul 29, 2021
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In my opinion, the nearest technologies to support Space exploration and processes handling (e.g. new launches, existing satellites coordination) are:
- Machine Learning and Data Science. Actually they are already there but with a lot to go;
- All the research that gives us zoom in to particles and make them work as a reliable system (e.g. quantum data manipulation, energy delivery) will bring new materials, new facilities for faster and more effective stepping forward;
- Ecologic fuel approaches;
- The Earth surveillance (purposed existing technology development).
 
Jul 29, 2021
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You must perform a cost/benefit analysis on the micro/sats comparing their positives with the negatives the micro/sats create with Earth-bound observations of the universe which will be impacted to a greater degree with every new tranche of micro/sats launched. So far there have been amazing observations made at the very edge of the universe which require ever more lengthy observation times due to their distance. It is this observation time and the corresponding science, which is directly impacted by the light streaks caused by passing micro/sats due to the long term open apertures.

Could nearly invisible drones, either conventionally powered or solar powered for longer duration flights, in the lower atmosphere be better used to track poachers and their prey of rare animal species, and the other uses the micro/sats than Earth circling satellites leaving repetitive light trails?

View attachment 1075
Long duration, 30 plus hour, drone.

View attachment 1076
Solar drone.

I grow weary of pure science always taking a back seat because we, the large corporations serving us, cannot think outside the proverbial box.
Hartmann352
Despite the obvious advantages in the LEO launch race, the threat of growing orbit load became a fact. But still local reactive steps are discussed/planned to slow down the negative effects.



Pro’s:

  • LEO connectivity can improve network infrastructure resilience for regions prone to natural disasters;
  • Competition should reduce broadband prices where LEO-based internet service is permitted;
  • LEO constellations will improve satellite internet quality, expanding the applications and services that can be used;
  • Expanding LEO constellations are benefiting other space technologies, services;
  • The regularity of the launches uncovers drawbacks, gives more data for analysis and proactive control, pushes the technology and collaboration (all of the Global technology fields, including surveillance and communication, and corresponding agencies are involved).
Con’s:

  • Currently, there is not any common international regulations, Outer Space Treaty, designates the exploration and use of space as “the province of all mankind”;
  • Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC), representing 13 space agencies, indicated that direct re-entry at the end of a satellite’s operational life was preferred but nevertheless only recommended that deorbiting conclude within 25 years;
  • Mega-constellation operators and their regulators could respond that they are exercising the right to explore and use space without discrimination, however, the use of slots in geostationary orbit is mediated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which does not play the same role in LEO.
Concluding:

  • Radio astronomy is threatened, sky surveys and observations close to the horizon, especially near sunrise and sunset, are especially vulnerable;
  • However, new analysis methods could mitigate some of these effects, but data loss is inevitable, increasing the time needed for each study and limiting the overall amount of science done;
  • There are reasons for hope. SpaceX is showing some leadership with rapid end-of-life deorbiting, automatic collision avoidance, and visors to reduce light pollution, even if these are not yet sufficient;
  • Spacefaring countries, moreover, recognize that debris threatens all satellites, including military satellites;
  • NASA and ESA partnership hopefully bring tangible contribution for the near and far time solutions.
 
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I think the greatest "space tech" in recent years is the cheap application of the 10 u-meter IR slot.

And along with that, the ability of material science, to engineer a composite of amorphous and crystalline materials, in which multiplies the thermo-electric effect many fold.

These two are future winners in my view. A self cooling, self heating, fresh water producing and self electric generation potential for your house. With the sun and ambient temp as a source and the slot as a sink.

No rare materials are needed for any of this.

One would think the climateers would be all over these passive applications.

These are real problem solvers.
 
Jul 29, 2021
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The subject is vital in the news, debated and discussed about rising satellite launch cases and innovations in this field.

Space is not an exclusion for human behaviour: intrinsic striving for exploration and being reactive about consequences, junk and debris are orbiting the Earth.

Now the time has come to remove old artifacts and bring new technology up there.

We have 20k+ junk pieces already in orbit for all the time, since Sputnik was launched as the first satellite.

Nowadays only Starlink count is sending 15k satellites and preparing twice more to be sent.That is the fact, Starlink is pushing the events and causes.

Space junk is the hazard problem that has been there for decades, and nowadays with the space exploration boost only we try to surpass it.

1. Satellite rush launches are an inevitable necessity. As it has the purpose of wide coverage roll out. And there is no other way than to launch lots. This means that the data is delivered to where it is really needed.

2. Particular scientific and environment surveillance purposes are important. NASA and ESA together emphasise it in partnership. Space X wide coverage, other dedicated private companies perform effective launches. British satellites by Skyrora (https://www.skyrora.com/blog/tag/uk-satellites) company is a good example.

3. Yes, even large astronomy observation programs already raise strong complaints due to observation pollution, which must imply launch control restrictions increase.

3. Humanity would not be where it is now without an intrinsic strive for exploration. We might go extinct (at least partially) in small tribal clashes, natural disasters, starving without exploration and cooperation.

4. Space exploration and the benefits that are aimed at it are logical from the point (1). Information gathering is precious. Global network for society is sometimes vital. surveillance for the Earth's environmental issues, data coverage, where it is not possible to deliver the internet by fiber optic. The main purpose of the internet is not leisure, it is connection, including emergency cases. One of the best internet achievements is education, which is one of the keys of social stability and even survival.

There must be mitigation points behind (also undergoing development):

1. Automatic manoeuvring systems continuous calibration.

2. Emergency actions for the critical collisions that might happen.

3. The proactive actions:

Space X, announced debris removal experiments, NASA & ESA are going to partner on this kind of global issues, more private companies (such as Skyrora, UK satellite industry) with steadily developed new technology are on it also.
 
Sep 6, 2021
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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
LOL they just built a new Apollo capsule, so much for new
 
Jul 29, 2021
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Orbital refueling.

orbital refueling will be the bedrock of the burgeoning new space economy, in which goods and spacecraft will need to be transferred from one orbit to another (a maneuver that’s extremely fuel-intensive), or to build out supply chains to return resources to Earth.
 
Sep 6, 2021
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Orbital refueling.

orbital refueling will be the bedrock of the burgeoning new space economy, in which goods and spacecraft will need to be transferred from one orbit to another (a maneuver that’s extremely fuel-intensive), or to build out supply chains to return resources to Earth.
Orbital refueling means less than nothing because once orbit is left there are no more fuel stops. What is needed is a fuel source that can be replenished during flight which might mean a very large ship with recycling ability
 
Jul 29, 2021
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Mining asteroids is proposed but comically stupid unless you can catch the asteroid and end it's orbit. No one knows how to do this
It is really hard to catch an asteroid.
But ML and manuevering in space are going to go far by then.
It is actually a hot topic for many comanies.
 

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