The emerging space technology

bearnard1616

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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
 
Nov 12, 2020
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The fact that space technologies are being developed and being proliferated bodes well for progress here on Earth for better human living conditions and possibly life sustaining resource preservation. As for space travel and extraterrestrial colonization, in my opinion at this time period and for a maybe a century, "we can't get there from here"; from technology, but mostly from physiology and psychology considerations. I would relish being wrong.
 
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bearnard1616

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Nov 18, 2020
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The fact that space technologies are being developed and being proliferated bodes well for progress here on Earth for better human living conditions and possibly life sustaining resource preservation. As for space travel and extraterrestrial colonization, in my opinion at this time period and for a maybe a century, "we can't get there from here"; from technology, but mostly from physiology and psychology considerations. I would relish being wrong.
Actually I like the idea how satellite and microsatellite technology are developing. Especially, I like microsatellites and how useful they are. They can be used for different purposes like tracking rare species of animals and observing mountains and glaciers from space. Unfortunately, microsatellites don`t have rather long term of usage but their launch is much cheaper and I guess they will be enough developed soon
 

bearnard1616

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And also, I wanna add that some private space company manufactures those satellites and other great space equipment and spacecrafts like Skylark Micro rocket which is made for microgravity missions an experimants and also can take those microsatellites on the orbit.
 
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Jan 27, 2020
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Actually I like the idea how satellite and microsatellite technology are developing. Especially, I like microsatellites and how useful they are. They can be used for different purposes like tracking rare species of animals and observing mountains and glaciers from space. Unfortunately, microsatellites don`t have rather long term of usage but their launch is much cheaper and I guess they will be enough developed soon
And also, I wanna add that some private space company manufactures those satellites and other great space equipment and spacecrafts like Skylark Micro rocket which is made for microgravity missions an experimants and also can take those microsatellites on the orbit.

As I said back in February, there are increasing problems with the proliferation of micro-satellites in Earth orbit...


"Call me crazy, but I'm worried about the increasing number of "things" in orbit because of my interest in astrophysics, astrophotography, and deep space exploration, both of which require lengthy amounts of clear viewing time for all types of Earth-bound telescopes. Additionally, even the LIGO gravitational wave experiments may be impacted from the electronic noise generated by the sheer numbers of these small satellites whizzing by overhead.

Apart from SpaceX, its rival company OneWeb has also expressed its intent to launch hundreds of its own satellites into space. Like Starlink, OneWeb’s satellites also aim to provide internet service from space.

With thousands of satellites about to launch into space, experts are worried about what would happen if these break down, tumble uncontrollably or burn up in re-entry. Eventually, these tiny spacecraft will end up as so much additional orbiting junk around Earth.

"If things break in space, it's pretty difficult to solve that problem," Tim Farrar, the president of the satellite communications research and consulting firm TMF Associates, told NPR. "It's not like your car breaking down on the side of the road with AAA available to give you a hand."

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are about 900,000 pieces of space junk smaller than 10 centimeters in low-Earth orbit. If companies continue to deploy their own satellites into space, this number could soon reach a million or more.

As previous reports have shown, the overcrowding in Earth’s vicinity has become a serious problem. In the autumn of 2019, one of SpaceX’s Starlink units almost collided with an ESA satellite. This fender-bender was avoided after the latter decided to fire up its thrusters to move out of the way.

More recently, the highly touted Satellite Constellations 1 Workshop Report from August of 2020, explained that: Existing and planned large constellations of bright satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEOsats) will fundamentally change astronomical observing at optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Nighttime images without the passage of a Sun-illuminated satellite will no longer be the norm. If the 100,000 or more LEOsats proposed by many companies and many governments are deployed, no combination of mitigations can fully avoid the impacts of the satellite trails on the science programs of current and planned ground-based optical-NIR astronomy facilities."
 
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bearnard1616

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Nov 18, 2020
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As I said back in February, there are increasing problems with the proliferation of micro-satellites in Earth orbit...


"Call me crazy, but I'm worried about the increasing number of "things" in orbit because of my interest in astrophysics, astrophotography, and deep space exploration, both of which require lengthy amounts of clear viewing time for all types of Earth-bound telescopes. Additionally, even the LIGO gravitational wave experiments may be impacted from the electronic noise generated by the sheer numbers of these small satellites whizzing by overhead.

Apart from SpaceX, its rival company OneWeb has also expressed its intent to launch hundreds of its own satellites into space. Like Starlink, OneWeb’s satellites also aim to provide internet service from space.

With thousands of satellites about to launch into space, experts are worried about what would happen if these break down, tumble uncontrollably or burn up in re-entry. Eventually, these tiny spacecraft will end up as so much additional orbiting junk around Earth.

"If things break in space, it's pretty difficult to solve that problem," Tim Farrar, the president of the satellite communications research and consulting firm TMF Associates, told NPR. "It's not like your car breaking down on the side of the road with AAA available to give you a hand."

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are about 900,000 pieces of space junk smaller than 10 centimeters in low-Earth orbit. If companies continue to deploy their own satellites into space, this number could soon reach a million or more.

As previous reports have shown, the overcrowding in Earth’s vicinity has become a serious problem. In the autumn of 2019, one of SpaceX’s Starlink units almost collided with an ESA satellite. This fender-bender was avoided after the latter decided to fire up its thrusters to move out of the way.

More recently, the highly touted Satellite Constellations 1 Workshop Report from August of 2020, explained that: Existing and planned large constellations of bright satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEOsats) will fundamentally change astronomical observing at optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Nighttime images without the passage of a Sun-illuminated satellite will no longer be the norm. If the 100,000 or more LEOsats proposed by many companies and many governments are deployed, no combination of mitigations can fully avoid the impacts of the satellite trails on the science programs of current and planned ground-based optical-NIR astronomy facilities."
I can agree with you that microsats enhance the number of space junk in the Earth's orbit. However, these microsatellites are very efficient in different areas. I have already mentioned in another thread the importance of the usage of these microsatellites. They can be used to observe the land and to track rare species of animals to prevent them from being killed by poachers.
 
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