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Student Solves a Decades-Old Physics Mystery

Dec 5, 2019
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Sorry, wanna be scientist here, but wouldn't the force of the gas molecule be less than the force of the liquid on such a scale as a nanometer? Possibly the forces on the bonds of the atoms even?
 
Dec 6, 2019
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I concur with IllWill. Could it be surface tension or static pressure that keeps a gas bubble trapped under a liquid? Wouldn't heating the tube just raise the gas pressure higher than the static pressure and break the surface tension?
 
Nov 27, 2019
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I would have thought the phenomenon to be related to capillary action and surface tension of the liquid versus adhesion to the container. I guess I still don't understand the forces involved in capillary action completely.
 
Jan 9, 2020
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"I was glad to complete a research project and type my essay on it with a new method in my homework set. I ended up publishing a paper that changed my life and solved a centuries-old enigma". - Wassim Dhaouadi
I think it's a great step forward for a summer research assistant. But I've been also wondering ... and I keep asking the same questions as IllWlll and Devilsadvocate. I'm not on good terms with my Physics professor (I refused to join his Physics Matters club), so I can't ask him, unfortunately.
 

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