Is mass energy, decoherence, and wave collapse the bridge between QM and GR? Is it the unified theory?

Dec 23, 2019
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Those are the necessary ingredients for the bridge.

A coherent/plane wave starts to cross the bridge without the use of spacetime. If its mass energy is lower than a virus it will not be able to cross unless there is a decoherence event on the bridge. If there is decoherence in the path, the coherent wave is assigned spacetime from the start (the quantum field doesn't use spacetime so it knows preemptively) and becomes a mixed state wave packet. It now has what it needs to cross most of the bridge, but to complete it as a physical particle it will hit the decoherence event and wave collapse into a physical particle.

The other option is for the coherent/plane wave to cross without decohering and smashing into a spacetime sized object on the other side. It would remain coherent while crossing the bridge.


How do you introduce spatial and temporal to a wave function? In doing so would the coherent wave become a wave packet? If you could then add wave collapse, would the wave packet become a physical particle?

Does an observable operator introduce spatial and temporal to a coherent wave to become a mixed state wave packet?

How do we get wave collapse in? Is that what a density matrix is? Can a density matrix be introduced mid flight while a wave packet if propagating? Is there a name for the location of the decoherence event in the path?
 
Dec 23, 2019
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Gravity doesn't belong in the standard model because a certain level of mass energy or decoherence is required to interact with the fabric of spacetime.
 
Dec 23, 2019
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The reason the Higgs boson's mass energy is so low is because it is not responsible for the mass of the particle. It is what allows wave collapse to a physical particle. It is what couples the particle to the Higgs field.
 
Dec 23, 2019
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Can the theory of everything describe dark matter if we remove the part that describes the Higgs boson? aka dark matter doesn't have a Higgs boson.
 
Jan 6, 2020
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Quantum decoherence is the loss of quantum coherence. In quantum mechanics, particles such as electrons are described by a wave function, a mathematical representation of the quantum state of a system; a probabilistic interpretation of the wave function is used to explain various quantum effects. As long as there exists a definite phase relation between different states, the system is said to be coherent. A definite phase relationship is necessary to perform quantum computing on quantum information encoded in quantum states. Coherence is preserved under the laws of quantum physics.

If a quantum system were perfectly isolated, it would maintain coherence indefinitely, but it would be impossible to manipulate or investigate it. If it is not perfectly isolated, for example during a measurement, coherence is shared with the environment and appears to be lost with time; a process called quantum decoherence. As a result of this process, quantum behavior is apparently lost, just as energy appears to be lost by friction in classical mechanics.

Decoherence was first introduced in 1970 by the German physicist H. Dieter Zeh and has been a subject of active research since the 1980s.[2] Decoherence has been developed into a complete framework, but it does not solve the measurement problem, as the founders of decoherence theory admit in their seminal papers.[3]

Decoherence can be viewed as the loss of information from a system into the environment (often modeled as a heat bath),[4] since every system is loosely coupled with the energetic state of its surroundings. Viewed in isolation, the system's dynamics are non-unitary (although the combined system plus environment evolves in a unitary fashion). Thus the dynamics of the system alone are irreversible. As with any coupling, entanglements are generated between the system and environment. These have the effect of sharing quantum information with—or transferring it to—the surroundings.

Decoherence has been used to understand the collapse of the wave function in quantum mechanics. Decoherence does not generate actual wave-function collapse. It only provides an explanation for apparent wave-function collapse, as the quantum nature of the system "leaks" into the environment. That is, components of the wave function are decoupled from a coherent system and acquire phases from their immediate surroundings. A total superposition of the global or universal wavefunction still exists (and remains coherent at the global level), but its ultimate fate remains an interpretational issue. Specifically, decoherence does not attempt to explain the measurement problem. Rather, decoherence provides an explanation for the transition of the system to a mixture of states that seem to correspond to those states observers perceive. Moreover, our observation tells us that this mixture looks like a proper quantum ensemble in a measurement situation, as we observe that measurements lead to the "realization" of precisely one state in the "ensemble".
 
Mar 4, 2020
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It has always appeared to me, that the existence of the quantum states, strongly implies a lack of probability.

I believe a charge is in a rotational resonance. And it has to be tuned to be stable.
 
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