Is Gravity finite or infinite ?

Jan 6, 2020
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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Friedmann_universes.svg, Open the link

The age and ultimate fate of the universe can be determined by measuring the Hubble constant today and extrapolating with the observed value of the deceleration parameter, uniquely characterized by values of density parameters (ΩM for matter and ΩΛ for dark energy). A "closed universe" with ΩM > 1 and ΩΛ = 0 comes to an end in a Big Crunch and is considerably younger than its Hubble age. An "open universe" with ΩM ≤ 1 and ΩΛ = 0 expands forever and has an age that is closer to its Hubble age. For the accelerating universe with nonzero ΩΛ that we inhabit, the age of the universe is coincidentally very close to the Hubble age.

The question arises does gravity have a localized force/ mass, Gm > 1, ΩΛ = 0, a closed universe, we come to an end or is it a constant force/mass, Gm < 1, ΩΛ = 0, extends for infinitely. If ΩΛ is equal to non-zero lack of friction, then it would be the inverse of the Higgs boson. It would allow particles to regenerate themselves into new forms or too disintegrate into nothing.
My thought is gravity is finite and the universe is closed. For the simple fact everything from sub particles to large mass objects are spherical in shape.
Would like to hear other thoughts.
 
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Dec 26, 2019
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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Friedmann_universes.svg, Open the link

The age and ultimate fate of the universe can be determined by measuring the Hubble constant today and extrapolating with the observed value of the deceleration parameter, uniquely characterized by values of density parameters (ΩM for matter and ΩΛ for dark energy). A "closed universe" with ΩM > 1 and ΩΛ = 0 comes to an end in a Big Crunch and is considerably younger than its Hubble age. An "open universe" with ΩM ≤ 1 and ΩΛ = 0 expands forever and has an age that is closer to its Hubble age. For the accelerating universe with nonzero ΩΛ that we inhabit, the age of the universe is coincidentally very close to the Hubble age.

The question arises does gravity have a localized force/ mass, Gm > 1, ΩΛ = 0, a closed universe, we come to an end or is it a constant force/mass, Gm < 1, ΩΛ = 0, extends for infinitely. If ΩΛ is equal to non-zero lack of friction, then it would be the inverse of the Higgs boson. It would allow particles to regenerate themselves into new forms or too disintegrate into nothing.
My thought is gravity is finite and the universe is closed. For the simple fact everything from sub particles to large mass objects are spherical in shape.
Would like to hear other thoughts.
Well since I think their is a multitude of other universes if not an infinite amount. There has to be an end to this universe. If we look at the ancient saying as above so below. It would mean this Universe is revolving around something on the outside of it. Maybe there is a whole new law of physics whatever this universe sits in. Meaning an even bigger space which all the other universes are in. That make sense?
 
Jan 6, 2020
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If we are revolving around something else maybe another Universe could be one answer the other answer is that there is nothing. Scientist are working to figure out if nothing has its own oscillating wave field. Even if they conclude nothing has a wave then they are left with finding the particle. Like gravity they know and observe the oscillating wave field but the particle is harder to observe. The Higgs boson is a classic example they know the particle is there because after the explosion it splits into two photons but they cannot see as of yet maybe this year when they fire up the Cern collider time will tell. Particles and waves are not the same thing on one hand but the same on the other hand they are that is what makes Quantum physics the weird science.
 

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