Question Is Cytokine Storm or Sepsis a Factor in COVID-19 deaths?

Mar 19, 2020
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In some of the accounts I've read, healthy young and middle-aged people who seemed to be recovering from a COVID-19 infection relapsed and died.
Could the cause could be a cytokine storm and/or sepsis? If so, addressing that would improve treatment.
https://www.uab.edu/reporter/know-more/publications/item/8909-here-s-a-playbook-for-stopping-deadly-cytokine-storm-syndrome

I realize it's a big pivot from pediatric rheumatology to viral pandemics, but thought I'd see if this idea is getting any serious scientific attention.
 
Mar 9, 2020
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I am not connectted with medicine but... a lot of people suggests that the cytokine storm is a cause of death in the new virus.

It seems irrefutable that patients lungs fill with mucus that they are unable to clear and this causes death. This mucus is due to immune reaction so too much of an immune reaction is a cause of death. If this hypercytokinemia
"A severe immune reaction in which the body releases too many cytokines into the blood too quickly"
can be called a "cytokine storm", then yes.

However, the 1918 flue caused a cytokine storm so potent that it resulted in negative feedback loop, with excessive cytokines attacking the lung tissue, causing increased inflammation, bleeding, and the release of more cytokines. It killed very quickly. This negative feedback loop which is perhaps the quintessential cytokine storm.

The current virus however seems to result simply in an overproduction of mucus that patients fail to clear.

While I am neither connected with medicine nor bats, I have been wondering whether the excessive production of mucus in the current disease is properly considered hypercytokinemia, or rather due to the fact that the virus originated in bats who (I am told by bat care-giving youtubers) do not cough from the chest, but (I presume) clear their mucus using gravity since they live upside down.

If t hat which is being called "cyctokine storm" or "hypercytokinemia" is really rather just "bat cold" (my non medical term), then the Trendelenburg position with mouth higher than lungs may help.

The trendelenburg position may also be dangerous, especially in those with ocular pathologies, head injuries, or are over weight since their organs may constrict their diaphragm, according to research I have read, though I am not connected with medicine.
 
Mar 24, 2020
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In some of the accounts I've read, healthy young and middle-aged people who seemed to be recovering from a COVID-19 infection relapsed and died.
Could the cause could be a cytokine storm and/or sepsis? If so, addressing that would improve treatment.
https://www.uab.edu/reporter/know-more/publications/item/8909-here-s-a-playbook-for-stopping-deadly-cytokine-storm-syndrome

I realize it's a big pivot from pediatric rheumatology to viral pandemics, but thought I'd see if this idea is getting any serious scientific attention.

The Marik protocol for treating sepsis and ARDS may be helpful.
 
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Mar 24, 2020
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The Marik protocol for treating sepsis and ARDS may be helpful.
Also, this article explains why baking soda may be preventative:

 
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Mar 24, 2020
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Also, this article explains why baking soda may be preventative:

And one more article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25960222
 
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