Identity-Switching Neutrinos Could Reveal Why We Exist At All. But Can We Find Them?

Dec 11, 2019
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Sounds like a stretch. Hard see how if the phenomenon they're looking for is that rare, how it could account for anything, let along the presence of as much matter as there is in the universe. The possible real answer is that, despite the fact that for every matter particle there is, theoretically, a corresponding anti-particle, theoretically does not mean physically necessary. For me, this kind of apparently pseudo-problem continues to undercut the validity of cosmology (which strikes me as mostly an exercise in sheer, unverifiable/unfalsifiable speculation anyway)....
 
Jan 21, 2020
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If matter containing regular nuclei can undergo double beta decay that changes neutrons to protons, and electrons and two antineutrinos that cancel each other out,
Why can't two antineutrons in an antimatter nucleus decay into a positron and two neutrinos that cancel each other out leaving one positron and two antiprotons in the exact inverse process? If that happens why would there be more matter than antimatter instead of equal amounts that annihilated each other leaving nothing?
 
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Jan 21, 2020
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Sounds like a stretch. Hard see how if the phenomenon they're looking for is that rare, how it could account for anything, let along the presence of as much matter as there is in the universe. The possible real answer is that, despite the fact that for every matter particle there is, theoretically, a corresponding anti-particle, theoretically does not mean physically necessary. For me, this kind of apparently pseudo-problem continues to undercut the validity of cosmology (which strikes me as mostly an exercise in sheer, unverifiable/unfalsifiable speculation anyway)....
They think it wouldn't be rare at the big bang when the the temperature of the universe was untold quintillions of times hotter and everything took place faster and with more energy.
 

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