How To 

How to Safely Work in a Laboratory



One too many superhero movies may have you convinced that lab accidents lead to incredible powers, but 9 times out of 10 that doesn’t happen in the real world. Laboratories demand the utmost care and attention in order to avoid safety hazards and keep yourself as well as others in the lab safe. Here’s how to work in a lab safely:

1. Always wear protective clothing.
Step one is to show up prepared. Wear closed toe shoes, long sleeves, and pants in addition to a lab coat and safety glasses. Also ensure that if you have long hair you tie it back, and wear either stud earrings or no jewelry whatsoever. Bracelets and rings should be removed and placed somewhere safe, not just because they could get in the way but also because certain solutions could ruin the finish.



2. If anything gets on your skin or in your eyes, immediately head to an emergency eyewash or safety shower station.
They’re there for a reason. If anything gets into your eyes, you need to flush them out immediately. Head to an eyewash station and rinse out your eyes for at least 15 minutes, rotating your eyes around to ensure you’re getting any and all contaminants out. If anything gets on your skin or you have a major spill, you might need to head to the safety shower immediately. Take off anything contaminated, even under clothing, and rinse for at least 15 minutes.



3. If you don’t know what it is, don’t touch it or mix it with anything.
Sure, mystery substances are intriguing, but they can also be volatile and highly toxic. If you come across any unmarked containers or don’t know what a certain chemical is or does, don’t mess with it. If you’re really curious, find the lab supervisor and get assistance from them.

4. Stay aware of your surroundings.
Labs are no place for horseplay or messing around. Lack of attention leads to accidents, so make sure you’re always paying attention to what’s going on around you. This can help you avoid bumping into others who are carrying delicate equipment, knocking over vials, or causing any other avoidable accident.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ousainou
Nov 20, 2019
7
0
30


One too many superhero movies may have you convinced that lab accidents lead to incredible powers, but 9 times out of 10 that doesn’t happen in the real world. Laboratories demand the utmost care and attention in order to avoid safety hazards and keep yourself as well as others in the lab safe. Here’s how to work in a lab safely:

1. Always wear protective clothing.
Step one is to show up prepared. Wear closed toe shoes, long sleeves, and pants in addition to a lab coat and safety glasses. Also ensure that if you have long hair you tie it back, and wear either stud earrings or no jewelry whatsoever. Bracelets and rings should be removed and placed somewhere safe, not just because they could get in the way but also because certain solutions could ruin the finish.



2. If anything gets on your skin or in your eyes, immediately head to an emergency eyewash or safety shower station.
They’re there for a reason. If anything gets into your eyes, you need to flush them out immediately. Head to an eyewash station and rinse out your eyes for at least 15 minutes, rotating your eyes around to ensure you’re getting any and all contaminants out. If anything gets on your skin or you have a major spill, you might need to head to the safety shower immediately. Take off anything contaminated, even under clothing, and rinse for at least 15 minutes.



3. If you don’t know what it is, don’t touch it or mix it with anything.
Sure, mystery substances are intriguing, but they can also be volatile and highly toxic. If you come across any unmarked containers or don’t know what a certain chemical is or does, don’t mess with it. If you’re really curious, find the lab supervisor and get assistance from them.

4. Stay aware of your surroundings.
Labs are no place for horseplay or messing around. Lack of attention leads to accidents, so make sure you’re always paying attention to what’s going on around you. This can help you avoid bumping into others who are carrying delicate equipment, knocking over vials, or causing any other avoidable accident.
Hey Sarah the precautions in a laboratory that you hav just highlighted reminded me of some funny, scary incident that happened in my school.
Interesting post..
 
Jun 9, 2020
18
4
35
Carefully making things work is Quality Control. It is not substantive.
Carefully making things resist failure is Quality Assurance. It works.

Protect your eyes with chemical goggles. Do not wear things that melt. Ask the old fart in the lab or your PI about procedure. Do not encumber yourself with safety equipment that negatively affects your performance. Always have backup in the lab to drag you to a safety shower.

Phosgene is not scrubbed by a water aspirator, Skived Teflon tape on aluminum screw threads explodes when tightened. The first time is ignorance, the second is stupidity. Learn your craft and its art...rapidlly. Look it up before you do it.

The universe wants you dead. Snarl back in a friendly manner.
 
Jun 25, 2020
1
0
10
Chemistry laboratories in schools can be indeed hazardous for children. Each school should have a lab safety plan and customwritingz protocols that should be followed by teachers and schoolkids.
I work as a chemistry teacher (studied at WSU) in a private middle school and we have safety control measures checked each month. The school administration hired an inspector from a private agency who comes to school on a monthly basis to check the system and perform engineering controls.
 
Oct 14, 2020
3
0
10


One too many superhero movies may have you convinced that lab accidents lead to incredible powers, but 9 times out of 10 that doesn’t happen in the real world. Laboratories demand the utmost care and attention in order to avoid safety hazards and keep yourself as well as others in the lab safe. Here’s how to work in a lab safely:

1. Always wear protective clothing.
Step one is to show up prepared. Wear closed toe shoes, long sleeves, and pants in addition to a lab coat and safety glasses. Also ensure that if you have long hair you tie it back, and wear either stud earrings or no jewelry whatsoever. Bracelets and rings should be removed and placed somewhere safe, not just because they could get in the way but also because certain solutions could ruin the finish.



2. If anything gets on your skin or in your eyes, immediately head to an emergency eyewash or safety shower station.
They’re there for a reason. If anything gets into your eyes, you need to flush them out immediately. Head to an eyewash station and rinse out your eyes for at least 15 minutes, rotating your eyes around to ensure you’re getting any and all contaminants out. If anything gets on your skin or you have a major spill, you might need to head to the safety shower immediately. Take off anything contaminated, even under clothing, and rinse for at least 15 minutes.



3. If you don’t know what it is, don’t touch it or mix it with anything.
Sure, mystery substances are intriguing, but they can also be volatile and highly toxic. If you come across any unmarked containers or don’t know what a certain chemical is or does, don’t mess with it. If you’re really curious, find the lab supervisor and get assistance from them.

4. Stay aware of your surroundings.
Labs are no place for horseplay or messing around. Lack of attention leads to accidents, so make sure you’re always paying attention to what’s going on around you. This can help you avoid bumping into others who are carrying delicate equipment, knocking over vials, or causing any other avoidable accident.
 
Oct 14, 2020
3
0
10
hi
you are talking about
How to Safely Work in a Laboratory.you have to lab with full safety kit.for more you have to google on it.
 
Jun 9, 2020
18
4
35
Do not enter the lab unless you are competent and sober . Injury, mutilation, and death target diversity (qualification by demonstrated inability).
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts