How To 

How to Reduce Your Sugar Intake



We’re a world that loves sugar, that much is certain. We put it in and on everything, from our morning cup of coffee to the dessert we end the night with. All this sugar adds up and accumulates, resulting in less than stellar health. So, what should we do? The answer seems obvious, but the execution is far less so. Here’s what you can do to consume less sugar:

1. Switch out your sweeteners.
Let’s get this out of the way first: not all sugars are bad. In fact, you need some of them to provide your body with energy. Refined table sugars are not one of those kinds. Instead of adding a few lumps or spoonfuls to your morning beverage, reach for something like honey. Beware of artificial sweeteners that claim to be sugar substitutes; the vast majority of them are no better.



2. Ditch soda, candies, and pastries.
Besides the fact that these treats offer no nutritional value, they’re packed with sugar. They might taste good, but in addition to not filling you up, they can damage your teeth and contribute to insulin resistance, leading to diabetes. There are so many alternatives, and if you still want pastries occasionally you can make your own at home and control the amount and type of sugar you use. If you just have to have something bubbly, go for sparkling water and flavor it with fresh fruits.



3. Look out for added sugar on food labels.
Sugar is sneaky and can pop up in unexpected places. The best way to cut out sugar besides staying away from the obvious sources is to check food labels. Sugar has many different names on labels (you can find a list here), so be aware that it won’t always be the obvious “sugar” you’ll see. Sugar isn’t always added for flavor; sometimes it’s present to enhance shelf life, so don’t think that only sweet foods and drinks will have added sugar. Things like canned soup and pasta sauce can have way more sugar than necessary, so read diligently.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shuddhi
Per Daria91: metabolic condition, yos. Normalising metabolism resets the body, and relieves us of at least much involvement.

How, do you saay?

For my body, meat (especially beef, Dear Me) and fat, and some native type grains, a little vegetables. NO FRUIT - NOT EVEN BERRIES.

For your body: what causes you to feel well throughout the day, consuming nothing else besides water, and allows you regular, normative movements, with little to no gas throughout the day. (In my experience, the gas hardly or don't smell.)
 
Last edited:

Gringoz

BANNED
Oct 3, 2020
69
2
55


We’re a world that loves sugar, that much is certain. We put it in and on everything, from our morning cup of coffee to the dessert we end the night with. All this sugar adds up and accumulates, resulting in less than stellar health. So, what should we do? The answer seems obvious, but the execution is far less so. Here’s what you can do to consume less sugar:

1. Switch out your sweeteners.
Let’s get this out of the way first: not all sugars are bad. In fact, you need some of them to provide your body with energy. Refined table sugars are not one of those kinds. Instead of adding a few lumps or spoonfuls to your morning beverage, reach for something like honey. Beware of artificial sweeteners that claim to be sugar substitutes; the vast majority of them are no better.



2. Ditch soda, candies, and pastries.
Besides the fact that these treats offer no nutritional value, they’re packed with sugar. They might taste good, but in addition to not filling you up, they can damage your teeth and contribute to insulin resistance, leading to diabetes. There are so many alternatives, and if you still want pastries occasionally you can make your own at home and control the amount and type of sugar you use. If you just have to have something bubbly, go for sparkling water and flavor it with fresh fruits.



3. Look out for added sugar on food labels.
Sugar is sneaky and can pop up in unexpected places. The best way to cut out sugar besides staying away from the obvious sources is to check food labels. Sugar has many different names on labels (you can find a list here), so be aware that it won’t always be the obvious “sugar” you’ll see. Sugar isn’t always added for flavor; sometimes it’s present to enhance shelf life, so don’t think that only sweet foods and drinks will have added sugar. Things like canned soup and pasta sauce can have way more sugar than necessary, so read diligently.
Don't eat anything with a food label and your processed sugar intake will be zero
 
Oct 14, 2020
4
0
10
Hello All!!

Yes! We should be more careful while eating outside foods! It is also more important to look after the foods we cook at our home. There are some healthy and natural alternatives to replace white sugar as Stevia, Xylitol, and Brown sugar, etc. It helps with weight loss and improves health, favoring the prevention and control of diseases such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity.
 
Nov 26, 2019
67
13
555
Although may seem simple, it's a hard habit to break (even reduce). Think about reducing coffee intake. Yes, the reality in doing it is very hard. As soon as I come close to living the reality, something happens and back to starting all over again.

Appreciate the article though :unsure:
 
Mar 19, 2020
307
42
730
Although may seem simple, it's a hard habit to break (even reduce). Think about reducing coffee intake. Yes, the reality in doing it is very hard. As soon as I come close to living the reality, something happens and back to starting all over again.

Appreciate the article though :unsure:
I never started, I just drink tea if I have to.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY