Hawaii just got a new 'largest volcano on Earth.' (Condolences to Mauna Loa.)

May 21, 2020
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Mauna Kea or( Maunaawakea) is the largest volcanoe on the big island of hawaii not mauna loa ... but they are relatively close in proximity you mean to correct the article to mauna kea. And putting condolences to any such grounds here will stir up anger and controversy. A wise decision would be for you to change the wording and connotation in reference to the volcanoes... especially after all of the recent controversy. Do not write condolences mauna kea! May be "we found your even bigger brother" or "whats bigger than mauna kea" etc would be more respectful etc. Because these volcanoes are interconnected under the earth they are related you could say... etc so just using the word condolences and the wrong volcanoe is already upsetting and when actually referencing the main volcanoe in such a way will stir up major controversy. Its a simple mistake but couldve been avoided and addressed with more respect and sensitivity by researching the current situation which was broadcast world wide. Other than that amazing article with great info. Mahalo
 
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May 21, 2020
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Mauna Kea or( Maunaawakea) is the largest volcanoe on the big island of hawaii not mauna loa ... but they are relatively close in proximity you mean to correct the article to mauna kea. And putting condolences to any such grounds here will stir up anger and controversy. A wise decision would be for you to change the wording and connotation in reference to the volcanoes... especially after all of the recent controversy. Do not write condolences mauna kea! May be "we found your even bigger brother" or "whats bigger than mauna kea" etc would be more respectful etc. Because these volcanoes are interconnected under the earth they are related you could say... etc so just using the word condolences and the wrong volcanoe is already upsetting and when actually referencing the main volcanoe in such a way will stir up major controversy. Its a simple mistake but couldve been avoided and addressed with more respect and sensitivity by researching the current situation which was broadcast world wide. Other than that amazing article with great info. Mahalo
Possibly reword to someone else we can all look up to etc etc
 
May 22, 2020
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Mauna Loa is for sure the more massive volcano than Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is taller as Michael points out.

Shandelles 1 has quite a lengthy swing and a miss. I recommend some classes at U.H. Hilo. Great place! As far as changing the wording on the article from "condolences" to "bigger (brother) uncle", (Uncle is more Hawaiian), that is a whole other thing. Nothing wrong with an opinion.
 
May 21, 2020
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Mauna Loa is for sure the more massive volcano than Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is taller as Michael points out.

Shandelles 1 has quite a lengthy swing and a miss. I recommend some classes at U.H. Hilo. Great place! As far as changing the wording on the article from "condolences" to "bigger (brother) uncle", (Uncle is more Hawaiian), that is a whole other thing. Nothing wrong with an opinion.
Took classes...mauna loa is large but mauna kea is larger from my slowly fading memory lol. But yes i agree uncle is a great one there. As far as sheild volcanoes go hawaii has prime examples but what ive known was mauna kea was king yet maunaloa is large as well been hiking up maunaloa and the unobstructed view from such a gradual incline is exceptional! Im cool with being wrong in any case but if hes trying to say its the biggest volcanoe in what ways? Uncle cousin aunty all better than condolances
 
May 21, 2020
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Mauna Kea is taller, but Mauna Loa has significantly more mass, which is what the study looked at.
Ok thank you for the correction. Im fine with being wrong in any case how much mass does maunloa carry over mauna kea? Something fun for me and my kids to learn about this week .
 
Dec 7, 2019
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Ok thank you for the correction. Im fine with being wrong in any case how much mass does maunloa carry over mauna kea? Something fun for me and my kids to learn about this week .
I don't remember the exact answer, but it is at least double (and that is probably understated by a factor of two). Mauna Loa means "Long Mountain" in Hawaiian. Perhaps that should be "Loooong Mountain". From certain directions, such as driving up the Saddle Road from the west, the two volcanoes appear to be of about the same size, but the crest of Mauna Loa is one long ridge. The profile of Mauna Kea is about the same in any direction, like that of Mt. Vesuvius (but not so steep because it is a shield volcano).

Wikipedia has a map that divides the island according to its five volcanoes. Mauna Loa is about half the projected area of the island (and more than that if one uses the surface areas of the individual mountains). Another way of putting this is that, if you wander randomly about the island (assuming you are are an expert climber), about half or more of the time you are standing on Mauna Loa lava.


I myself am not convinced that Kilauea (usually said to be the most "active" volcano in the world) should be considered independently of Mauna Loa, since it has no significant geographic prominence (i.e. no peak). It is more of bulge on the side of Mauna Loa. It is not therefore a separate and distinct mountain. This was an issue of dispute for many years, but volcanologists now seem to agree that Kilauea's underlying magma chamber is substantially independent of Mauna Loa's. Thus, it is classified as a separate volcano by them but not as a separate mountain by most geographers.

I raise this because the two islands discussed in the article might themselves be classified as distinct mountains by geographers, if measured from the ocean floor. That would depend on the depth of the saddle between them, which lies underwater. There is no universal agreement on the number that defines the required depth. The UIAA (a mountaineering society) says that a minimal descent of at least 300 meters (about 980 feet) as measured from the lesser peak defines two separate mountains. Otherwise the lesser peak is a just a sub-peak of a single mountain.

Does this mean they would also be separate volcanoes? Volcanologists apparently wouldn't care. They would ask if there were separate magma chambers for the two. This is nearly impossible to determine for extinct volcanoes, since the active magma chamber(s) is(are) long gone.

P.S. I am not a volcanologist, a geographer or a geologist. I'm just a retired chemist who lives on the island about two months of the year. If someone more expert wants to weigh in, have at it!
 
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Apr 13, 2020
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Sure bet one of these underwater eruptions would account for the Gilgamesh epic flood and/or the Noah flood. One probably turned our planet into a decades-long sauna.
 
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