Question Has Anyone Ever Tried to Calculate What the Observable Universe Looks Like "Presently"?

efarina96

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Oct 17, 2020
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Take a star 5,000 lightyears away. We can observe its properties, determine if it is orbited by planets and what the physical properties of those planets are, and make other inferences about the surrounding Universe as well as the Universe at large. But that was so 5,000 years ago. Where is that star now? Do we attempt to calculate this? What about the earliest observed galaxy?

Do we think about how this system has evolved? Are we observing some of its constituent parts in other, newer galaxies? Could we create an Atlas of the Present Universe, wherein we describe exactly where every object in the observed Universe is now and what it is doing?
Furthermore, if we could accomplish said task, would it forever alter the way we see the universe?
The Universe is Infinite. Infinity is real, and it is definite. That means whether it makes your brain hurt or not, there are objects *infinitely* far away that impact us in ways we are failing to understand.
But if we insist on going by what we see, let's at least be logical about it.
If we intend on using extrapolation, why not try to understand what the Universe *is* and not just what it *was*?
 
Nov 12, 2020
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Dr. Don Lincoln has videos on this subject on Fermilab.com. In addition, "Cosmology: The History and Nature of Our Universe" by Prof. Mark Whittle available via The Great Courses. It has nifty calculations and explanations. Yea! The 13.7 bly to the CMB as the observable Universe is pretty much common knowledge. With a little "Kentucky Windage" on a calculator, per the two sources, we can guesstamate that the 13.7 bly is now expanded to a circle centered on Earth with a diameter of ~96 bly. This begs the question will sapient beings in the far distant future believe what they currently observe in the Universe or will they believe what we have described in the dim, dark, past and relate it to what they observe or can no longer observe?
 
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efarina96

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Oct 17, 2020
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Dr. Don Lincoln has videos on this subject on Fermilab.com. In addition, "Cosmology: The History and Nature of Our Universe" by Prof. Mark Whittle available via The Great Courses. It has nifty calculations and explanations. Yea! The 13.7 bly to the CMB as the observable Universe is pretty much common knowledge. With a little "Kentucky Windage" on a calculator, per the two sources, we can guesstamate that the 13.7 bly is now expanded to a circle centered on Earth with a diameter of ~96 bly. This begs the question will sapient beings in the far distant future believe what they currently observe in the Universe or will they believe what we have described in the dim, dark, past and relate it to what they observe or can no longer observe?
Thanks for the info! I am excited to look into Dr. Lincoln's work.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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I am sure that someone has tried, but it is not possible at this time. We need a tool, that will allow us to measure the speed, direction and distance of stars. Right now, we can only make a sloppy guess. Almost everything in astronomy is an assumption. But in the future, if we can developed very fast electronic switches, we might be able to determine a precise distance, speed and direction of the stars. But we need to DSP(sample) light and x-ray frequencies. It might even be possible to get a precise g measurement of the star.

If one can determine the true speed and direction of a star......then over time, one can determine the distance of that star. But a star's direction(path,trajectory) is not linear......it is angular......so a star does not have velocity, it has acceleration. And an acceleration with distance plot, can give us a sim, both back and forth in time. Which will brighten or dim the universe. Our present universe is darker than what we see.

Unless our black hole went supernova 21k LY ago, and we don't see it for another thousand years. Then our present universe is much brighter than it appears now.
 
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