Grand Canyon Strata

Aug 3, 2020
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I watched a show that asked the following question. Why are the strata of rock layers seen in the Grand Canyon smooth? Should they be much more a set of peaks and valleys in the strata due to erosion? Would someone be able to explain this to me. If I am not clear as to what I am asking, please let me know and I’ll rephrase the question.
 
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Feb 19, 2020
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The rock strata in the Grand Canyon are not smooth close-up. Even at a distance, when viewed at the same level, they are not sets of peaks and valleys. And, at the bottom there is an erosional unconformity, a discontinuity below which the strata are at a steep angle. These are the oldest rocks, Precambrian in age, that were uplifted and eroded before the others were added one-by-one over millions of years. There are no vertebrate animals preserved in the Grand Canyon sediments and nothing but microbes at the bottom. A strong natural exhibit in support of biological evolution.
 
Mar 29, 2020
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most of the strata in the grand canyon are sea bed deposits, also, the processes that create peaks and valleys on the surface of the landscape are uplift and then partial erosion. When strata are laid down, they are going to be relatively flat, either seabed, or alluvial deposits, are basically processes where things get flatter, high stuff moving to the lowest points.
 
Feb 19, 2020
137
27
630
most of the strata in the grand canyon are sea bed deposits, also, the processes that create peaks and valleys on the surface of the landscape are uplift and then partial erosion. When strata are laid down, they are going to be relatively flat, either seabed, or alluvial deposits, are basically processes where things get flatter, high stuff moving to the lowest points.
The Grand Canyon deposits are not peaks ands valleys when viewed from across the canyon regardless of later erosion. The same rocks occur on both side of the canyon. The erosion by the river left them alone...the so-called layer-cake stratigraphic geology.
 
Mar 29, 2020
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The Grand Canyon deposits are not peaks ands valleys when viewed from across the canyon regardless of later erosion. The same rocks occur on both side of the canyon. The erosion by the river left them alone...the so-called layer-cake stratigraphic geology.
Yes, I was reading the question as "why are they layer cake, and not having peaks and valleys in the layers" and was trying to explain why most strata is layer cake like.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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Speculation about a dam breaking should have a scientific reference somewhere. An d that theory should explain where the dam was located and where the rocks went after the dam broke. The water would rush instantly across a flat plain to carve out a canyon that deep and then be gone into the ocean??? Seems doubtful that any geoscientist would come up with such a theory.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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Again, an absurd theory. If a dam broke the sediments comprising the dam would go with the water rushing toward the sea and be spread out along the way. This would take hours even weeks, but could not possibly dig out a canyon as deep as the Grand Canyon and transport all of those rocks as well.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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If it wasn't a river, what created the Grand Canyon? Your theory about a broken dam with a one-time flood has no physical evidence to support it. That is what's silly.
 
Mar 19, 2020
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No one knows exactly how the canyon was created. One theory says that a glacial water dam broke and that the grand canyon was created by the mass water flow in days or weeks not millions of years, as it took to lay down the strata.
Furthermore water erosion is often very smooth as seen.
Necropost?
 
Feb 19, 2020
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Why doesn't this creationist Mr. Finch answer his own question...as it applies to his little dam that broke? Where did all that water come from and where did it go leaving no traces while digging a trench a mile deep? Finch's silliness is unbecoming and boring.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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???? "So in other words you can not begin to explain how the Colorado river was ever able to carve a canyon 18 miles wide. Again the depth is not as important as the width which at 18 miles would have the Colorado river perhaps a millimeter deep and not able to wear down any rock."

Mr. Finch has ignored all of the comments and answers he has been given...including his own. In other words...neither can you Mr. Finch. Time to stop playing games.
 
Mar 19, 2020
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There is no scientific evidence that a river that is on average 18 feet deep carved an 18 mile wide canyon, because if you spread 18 feet over an 18 mile wide stretch then the water is only 0.000189 feet deep or about the depth of a single raindrop spread out on a dry rock. At that rate of erosion the grand canyon would actually be a mountain

Do the math silly

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The river was probably bigger when there was glacial meltwater 2.6 mya. Rivers also change course and have tribuatries. The entire canyon is a system, not a single riverbed.

We also see in areas like lake minssoula, where there was an actual dam break towards the end of the ice age, evidence of a large lake and fast erosion features. They are quite different.
 

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