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Final score, Plants 1, Chernobyl 0

Nov 18, 2019
9
2
35
I found it astonishing that plants did not die off after the Chernobyl disaster.
We all know that animals (including humans) returned in a relatively short period of time after the radioactive meltdown, but it was always interesting to me that the life that could not move at all, plants, managed to survive and thrive, and began taking over human habitations quite quickly.

The different ways that plants grow and respond to threats really bears looking at. Side note, not all plants can be grown from cuttings, as the article implies.

 
Feb 7, 2020
3
0
10
I found it astonishing that plants did not die off after the Chernobyl disaster.
We all know that animals (including humans) returned in a relatively short period of time after the radioactive meltdown, but it was always interesting to me that the life that could not move at all, plants, managed to survive and thrive, and began taking over human habitations quite quickly.

The different ways that plants grow and respond to threats really bears looking at. Side note, not all plants can be grown from cuttings, as the article implies.

The so called Chernobyl disaster was a human disaster but for all other life forms it was a boom Time the exclusion zone area is now packed with all of Europe's native wildlife, the question needs asking! A disaster for who?,
 

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