Question Does Schrodinger's idea of differently shaped atoms still hold good?

Aug 31, 2020
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Schrödinger came up with the idea of a 'wave packet' to represent the electron. Schrodinger’s wave packet model of the electron had the advantage in that since the energy of a wave, any wave, would disperse, the question of the electron radiating away its energy and falling into the nucleus, did not arise.

The wave packet model of the electron suggested by Schrodinger enjoyed a runaway success when it was first introduced. However, it was soon realised that Schrodinger’s wave equation could only describe the hydrogen atom with its single electron. When attempts were made to expand the theory to the atoms of other elements, disaster struck. This was because, a multi-dimensional space was required for this 'standing wave' model of the electron. Helium with its two electrons required a 6-dimensional space, lithium with three electrons got 9 dimensions and uranium with 92 electrons needed 276 dimensions. Schrodinger’s wave packet model had the additional disadvantage in that it was subject to dispersion. It did not retain its energy intact.

If one goes through this passage above and attempts to rationalise the assumptions which were/are drawn from this kind of thinking. Here is what we find. The proponents of Quantum mechanics will swear blind that this model of the atom, with its many different, far from spherical shapes, is correct.

schrdingers hydrogen model.jpg

But consider for a second how can this model of what an atom looks like possibly be correct when for the most part those models of the atom don’t even exist in our Universe? They exist in Universes that have different dimensions to ours. Understand that in our world, the solar system and the Universe. We have only four dimensions. These are length, breadth, depth and time. It is impossible for more dimensions than these to exist anywhere in the Universe as we know it. And it is not one or two extra dimensions that we are talking about but about the 276 dimensions that are needed to enable Schrodinger’s equation to give a complete description of all the elements. People might try to say; those are not extra dimensions they are degrees of freedom, as for instance the distance from the base of the nose to the lip. This is totally false. Here is what Max Born the inventor of the wave function has to say:

“We have two possibilities. Either we use waves in space of more than three dimensions…..or we remain in three dimensional space, but give up the simple picture of the wave amplitude as an ordinary physical magnitude , and replace it with a purely mathematical concept into which we cannot enter.” Yet one has to wonder how something that can be ethically unacceptable in the ‘real’ world can be perfectly justifiable in the abstract ‘mathematical’ world. …. " Max Born


At a time when it is practically possible to look at atoms through atomic force microscopes, where do Schrodingers weird ideas of atomic shapes fit in? Especially since most of those shapes exist in extra-terrestrial dimensions?
 

Gringoz

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Oct 3, 2020
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Schrödinger came up with the idea of a 'wave packet' to represent the electron. Schrodinger’s wave packet model of the electron had the advantage in that since the energy of a wave, any wave, would disperse, the question of the electron radiating away its energy and falling into the nucleus, did not arise.

The wave packet model of the electron suggested by Schrodinger enjoyed a runaway success when it was first introduced. However, it was soon realised that Schrodinger’s wave equation could only describe the hydrogen atom with its single electron. When attempts were made to expand the theory to the atoms of other elements, disaster struck. This was because, a multi-dimensional space was required for this 'standing wave' model of the electron. Helium with its two electrons required a 6-dimensional space, lithium with three electrons got 9 dimensions and uranium with 92 electrons needed 276 dimensions. Schrodinger’s wave packet model had the additional disadvantage in that it was subject to dispersion. It did not retain its energy intact.

If one goes through this passage above and attempts to rationalise the assumptions which were/are drawn from this kind of thinking. Here is what we find. The proponents of Quantum mechanics will swear blind that this model of the atom, with its many different, far from spherical shapes, is correct.

View attachment 656

But consider for a second how can this model of what an atom looks like possibly be correct when for the most part those models of the atom don’t even exist in our Universe? They exist in Universes that have different dimensions to ours. Understand that in our world, the solar system and the Universe. We have only four dimensions. These are length, breadth, depth and time. It is impossible for more dimensions than these to exist anywhere in the Universe as we know it. And it is not one or two extra dimensions that we are talking about but about the 276 dimensions that are needed to enable Schrodinger’s equation to give a complete description of all the elements. People might try to say; those are not extra dimensions they are degrees of freedom, as for instance the distance from the base of the nose to the lip. This is totally false. Here is what Max Born the inventor of the wave function has to say:

“We have two possibilities. Either we use waves in space of more than three dimensions…..or we remain in three dimensional space, but give up the simple picture of the wave amplitude as an ordinary physical magnitude , and replace it with a purely mathematical concept into which we cannot enter.” Yet one has to wonder how something that can be ethically unacceptable in the ‘real’ world can be perfectly justifiable in the abstract ‘mathematical’ world. …. " Max Born


At a time when it is practically possible to look at atoms through atomic force microscopes, where do Schrodingers weird ideas of atomic shapes fit in? Especially since most of those shapes exist in extra-terrestrial dimensions?
Schrodinger's cat is forever stuck in a mythical box wasting the time and energy of all
 

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