Could Earth be inside a black hole?

Jun 18, 2023
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Could the earth be inside a black hole? No. Nothing can fall to inside a black hole. Time stops at the event horizon. If time stops, motion can not exist at the event horizon and the temperature is at absolute zero.

Could the earth and everything that can be seen by the Hubble and Webb telescopes be extremely close to the event horizon of a black hole? Quite possibly.

One of the consequences of being in a very strong gravitational field is that your measuring stick becomes very small (as measured by an "outside" observer). (Just ask the people who design clocks for our GPS satellites.) If your measuring stick is in the process of becoming infinitely small, then your immediate surroundings will appear to becoming very large - billions of light years large. (And give the illusion that not only are they are moving away from you, but that this motion is accelerating. )

If you fall toward a black hole. as calculated by an outside observer (who thinks that the rules of a 3-D world still apply) your "energy" speed should be very close to the speed of light. If you assume an initial mass of one hydrogen atom and fall until you reach 99.999 . . . (for ~ 160 9's) % of the speed of light, when you divide the "M" in M*C^2 by sqrt(1 - V^2/C^2) this produces a new mass that is approximately equal to the visible mass of the known universe. (And of course the initial part of this fall would appear to happen very rapidly.)

Your local measurement of the speed of light is still a smidgen under 300,000 km/s. (It's the one constant you can trust.) The wavelength of light emitted by "distant" objects will appear to grow larger as your measuring stick shrinks. Hence the light from "distant" objects will be appear to redshift.

The temperature at the event horizon as stated earlier is at absolute zero. If you are very close to the event horizon, then the temperature of your background radiation would be very close to absolute zero - for example 2.725 K and slowly falling.

Perhaps we have been in a free fall for 13.7 +/- billion years (as measured by our clocks), and destined to continue free falling forever. Finally, if you are measuring your free fall, it's a one-way trip.
 
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Jan 14, 2020
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Wow,
Talk about theoretical! No one really knows what a black hole is anyway. Everything is theoretical! We have a certain amount of observation ability, and that's about it. More than likely black holes are designed to clean up the universe and produce or recycle matter. Hence the continuation of universal creation. All physics are local, And the only way to really know what's going on, is to see it, to go there. And that's way beyond our capabilities.

When you see what we call a black hole sailing through the universe, dragging newly formed stars and such, that tells you that black holes are about creating, and, about recycling matter. Also, there would have to be a direct correlation between dark matter and visible matter. The creation process of stars, solar systems, galaxies, are obviously connected to black holes. How they exactly function, who knows.

Look at the subduction zones on Earth, one continental plate will subduct under another, that land or crust will be recycled into magma. But that's not the only thing, the magma will rise up eventually and create new land. Same way black holes might suck up dark matter, and create visible matter. It would be an endless creation mill for an expanding universe.
 
Jun 18, 2023
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And for that matter, could our universe be inside a black hole?

Could Earth be inside a black hole? : Read more
I believe the universe itself it a hyper expansion of a black hole. It's more than likely oval of its retention and bears a spherical center we call the "observable universe". Outside of this center the light starts to bend of the oval curviture and we can't see further. Logically, a black hole is just light objecting/counter objecting itself. I believe that outside of the universe, there is a infinite and eternal body of light that we are within.
 
Jan 14, 2020
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Zach,
Interesting theorem, I guess we can kind of throw the string theory in there. Although it seems that the string theory has lost favor recently.

On this site, or, one of the related sites, it was determined by the James Web, that there was no point of a big bang, that everything appeared all at once! Now, that adds a whole new flavor to the whole physics thing and being inside of a black hole wouldn't it? I really think that people come up with some of these ideas because they're unhappy with their reality. So they would like to invent a reason why their reality sucks.

I think, if we look at the phrase willful delusion or willfully ignorant, we can throw that out there for those individuals that really come up with some far-fetched idea that maybe we're all in a computer program? And that somehow it can be rectified.

A person's life is what they make it, wisdom, discernment, and logical conclusions, can help with how you form your life, and a good helping of moral standard. Solomon, King David's son, said that there is nothing new under the sun. (That's in Ecclesiastes) And that there is a time for everything. If he were reading some of these theoretical hypotheses, he might have changed his mind, lol! And by you, I mean, everyone!
 
Jun 18, 2023
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Zach,
Interesting theorem, I guess we can kind of throw the string theory in there. Although it seems that the string theory has lost favor recently.

On this site, or, one of the related sites, it was determined by the James Web, that there was no point of a big bang, that everything appeared all at once! Now, that adds a whole new flavor to the whole physics thing and being inside of a black hole wouldn't it? I really think that people come up with some of these ideas because they're unhappy with their reality. So they would like to invent a reason why their reality sucks.

I think, if we look at the phrase willful delusion or willfully ignorant, we can throw that out there for those individuals that really come up with some far-fetched idea that maybe we're all in a computer program? And that somehow it can be rectified.

A person's life is what they make it, wisdom, discernment, and logical conclusions, can help with how you form your life, and a good helping of moral standard. Solomon, King David's son, said that there is nothing new under the sun. (That's in Ecclesiastes) And that there is a time for everything. If he were reading some of these theoretical hypotheses, he might have changed his mind, lol! And by you, I mean, everyone!
I see you found the eye of Ra. I believe that through remote viewing he formed the first "image" of everything in the universe before completion of the "great architecture". I swear, man, I believe existence itself started from a spark of electricity that formed a silver ball in its remnant. It just grows from there, to expansion into a iron orb with remnant once more reforming the silver sphere within it. It's all in and out development to me, until it reaches the climax of sounding a supernova against the woke light we are "within". It took me hours to imagine every possible degree of development but this seems to be to most logical to me in a type of creationism.
 
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Jan 14, 2020
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Zach,

Very interesting viewpoint my brother. I don't know if the ancient Egyptians actually had a grasp on creation, but, they weren't stupid either. The problem that I see with the Egyptians and the Greeks and the Romans, they all used philosophy to make their points. Philosophical opinions, and all of the philosophical houses that existed during those civilizations prime influence, really worked against each other in many ways. And then, we had other civilizations adopting deities and philosophies from the previous.

Rationality is more than someone's perspective, we have to observe as much as we can and actually come up with a rational idea or belief on what why or how.

As I recall, I believe the Babylonians believed that the Earth was flat, and it rested on the back of four elephants which stood on the back of a giant tortoise. And it wasn't so far back in time where they thought that the stars were actually stuck in a mesh around the centric Earth. I'm all for being progressive, but, I don't think I would be interested in going backwards. I don't want to go back into that stars in a mesh deading around the centric Earth. And the black hole issue being inside of one, seems eerily similar to that mesh netting holding stars. And, there are so many others going back to the flat earth issue, and I can't even fathom people believing the earth is flat. Not in this day and age. The sad thing is, if people can't prove their theories, they just throw water on truth and science. Everything is fake. How many times have we heard fake news? If you don't like it it must be fake. I don't think that's a good way to come to any sort of conclusion or agreement, philosophically, scientifically, theocratically, or intellectually.

John
 
Jun 19, 2023
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Very interesting article, but as a non-English speaking reader, I did not understand the meaning of the next sentence.

So any black hole Earth called home must be enormous, universe-size and so vast that we can't travel far enough or fast enough to detect the gravitational distortions, Field said.

I assume this means "If it is a planet-sized or solar-system-sized black hole, its effects are immediately apparent, so the fact that it is not means that it is a very massive black hole." is this correct?
 
Jun 19, 2023
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This is as much fantasy as science for the time being, but that's all we have at the edge of our understanding. It's an interesting thought.

Is it possible? Maybe? Who knows? Cool idea. Maybe an alternative to the big bounce? Instead of higher dimensional branes bumping into each other, every exploding star that collapses on itself and gives birth to a black hole is the birth of a new universe? New dimensions folding in the fabric of time and space?

Doesn't seem too outlandish, given how weird physics already is. Anyone who immediately dismisses this with a "no obviously not" doesn't appreciate how much we don't know.
 
Jun 19, 2023
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Very interesting article, but as a non-English speaking reader, I did not understand the meaning of the next sentence.

So any black hole Earth called home must be enormous, universe-size and so vast that we can't travel far enough or fast enough to detect the gravitational distortions, Field said.

I assume this means "If it is a planet-sized or solar-system-sized black hole, its effects are immediately apparent, so the fact that it is not means that it is a very massive black hole." is this correct?
As a native English speaker, it's still confusing. I don't know why they singled out Earth in the headline. They're contemplating the possibility that our entire expanding universe is inside a black hole.
 
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Jan 14, 2020
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Very interesting article, but as a non-English speaking reader, I did not understand the meaning of the next sentence.

So any black hole Earth called home must be enormous, universe-size and so vast that we can't travel far enough or fast enough to detect the gravitational distortions, Field said.

I assume this means "If it is a planet-sized or solar-system-sized black hole, its effects are immediately apparent, so the fact that it is not means that it is a very massive black hole." is this correct?
Fisher,

This would all be theoretical physics, and there are plenty of theoretical physicists out there. Tyson, and Kaku are two that come to mind, and they riff all the time about physics. Kaku is the one that said all physics are local. That means one set of the laws of physics in this region of space, and another set of laws of physics and another region of space.

Remember a while back, quite a while back, we were told that the expansion of the universe was slowing down and will soon start to contract back to the original point of the big bang. Basically annihilating everything and starting over again. Then later on, we've discovered that the universe is rapidly expanding and increasing the speed of that expansion. Now to me, that doesn't sound like being inside of any sort of black hole whatsoever. The gravity created inside of a black hole of that size would be tremendous, I don't think it would even remotely allow expansion. This might have been a better theory before they realized the universe was expanding and increasing that expansion exponentially.

So, either what we know about black holes is really nothing, or, black holes are something different than we thought. That's the thing about theoretical physics, there's a lot of guesstimations and hypothetical opinions. And, it's just that, hypothetical theorems. Everyone wants to be the next Einstein, and the drive to be immortalized in history has everyone throwing poop at the wall to see if anything will stick. No matter how untenable a theory is, that's the whole thing behind a theory, anything is possible.

John
 
Jun 19, 2023
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Could the earth be inside a black hole? No. Nothing can fall to inside a black hole. Time stops at the event horizon. If time stops, motion can not exist at the event horizon and the temperature is at absolute zero.

Could the earth and everything that can be seen by the Hubble and Webb telescopes be extremely close to the event horizon of a black hole? Quite possibly.

One of the consequences of being in a very strong gravitational field is that your measuring stick becomes very small (as measured by an "outside" observer). (Just ask the people who design clocks for our GPS satellites.) If your measuring stick is in the process of becoming infinitely small, then your immediate surroundings will appear to becoming very large - billions of light years large. (And give the illusion that not only are they are moving away from you, but that this motion is accelerating. )

If you fall toward a black hole. as calculated by an outside observer (who thinks that the rules of a 3-D world still apply) your "energy" speed should be very close to the speed of light. If you assume an initial mass of one hydrogen atom and fall until you reach 99.999 . . . (for ~ 160 9's) % of the speed of light, when you divide the "M" in M*C^2 by sqrt(1 - V^2/C^2) this produces a new mass that is approximately equal to the visible mass of the known universe. (And of course the initial part of this fall would appear to happen very rapidly.)

Your local measurement of the speed of light is still a smidgen under 300,000 km/s. (It's the one constant you can trust.) The wavelength of light emitted by "distant" objects will appear to grow larger as your measuring stick shrinks. Hence the light from "distant" objects will be appear to redshift.

The temperature at the event horizon as stated earlier is at absolute zero. If you are very close to the event horizon, then the temperature of your background radiation would be very close to absolute zero - for example 2.725 K and slowly falling.

Perhaps we have been in a free fall for 13.7 +/- billion years (as measured by our clocks), and destined to continue free falling forever. Finally, if you are measuring your free fall, it's a one-way trip.
Interesting idea
 
Jun 19, 2023
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Very interesting article, but as a non-English speaking reader, I did not understand the meaning of the next sentence.

So any black hole Earth called home must be enormous, universe-size and so vast that we can't travel far enough or fast enough to detect the gravitational distortions, Field said.

I assume this means "If it is a planet-sized or solar-system-sized black hole, its effects are immediately apparent, so the fact that it is not means that it is a very massive black hole." is this correct?
No, It's saying that if the Earth is in a black hole (which we would call home) it must be thus, enormous, universe-size and …
 
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Jun 18, 2023
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For anyone who would like to get in the deep water “Time does stop at the event horizon of a black hole” https://profoundphysics.com/why-time-slows-down-near-a-black-hole/

If you are a passenger on or within a (free) falling object (and its neighbors - e. g. earth and anything that can be seen from earth) that is falling into a black hole, what you are falling through will appear to be infinitely large. Any finite volume will appear to be infinitely large because your measuring stick (and anything else that you can see or measure) has shrunk to infinitely small.

As to what is inside the event horizon of a black hole, a black hole may share the properties of a Klein bottle – an object that only has one side. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klein_bottle

Where does all this lead? Classical (Mr. Isaac Newton's) physics tells us that 2/3 to 3/4 of the mass/energy in our universe is dark energy. In reality, the reason that nobody can determine what "dark energy" is, is because it doesn't actually exist. "Dark energy" may very well be an optical illusion.
 
Jan 21, 2020
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OK, here's my theory of how the big bang occurred.
1. The big bang occurs.
2. Stars form black holes that merge into larger black holes, and then form Super Massive Black Holes (SMBHs).
3. As the SMBHs get larger they acquire a huge amount of angular momentum (spin). Because SMBH drag space time around it's rotation all objects that fall into the SMBH will hit the singularity at an angle instead of straight on, imparting more and more spin to the SMBH.
4. As the SMBH spins up the singularity at the center starts to get stretched out into not a point, but into a very thin donut shape. This is now called a Penrose Black Hole.
5. When mater falls into a Penrose Black Hole the mater adds to the spin of the singularity, and the singularity grows.
6. This growth continues until the Penrose singularity starts to rub against the under side of the event horizon. Now energy starts to leak out of the Black Hole. As the energy leaks out, the Penrose Singularity shrinks back down, and stability is restored.
7. Then one faithful day in the future two very large Penrose Black Holes merge. However they merge in such a way as to have their angular momentums add together, and the spin of the new larger Penrose Singularity puts the singularity completely outside of the event horizon.
8. Now the newly merged Black Hole goes pop! The Black Hole becomes a white hole, and all the contents comes blasting out at greater than the speed of light (the speed of light is faster inside a Black Hole).
9. But the fun doesn't stop there. Since all Black Holes are connected through entanglement, the contents of all the other Black Holes through out the entire universe start coming out the popped Penrose Black Hole, and all the Black Holes in the Universe are emptied.
10. Now the process of Black Hole formation begins again.
That's my story, and I'm sticking with it.
 
Jun 18, 2023
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It appears that what we try to measure with our clocks is actually our progress through spacetime. It appears that we (and everything our telescopes can see) are falling inward toward a black hole's event horizon. (Have been doing so for ~13.8 billion years and will continue to do so forever.) Falling in spacetime is a one way trip which is why time is a one way trip. (This process defines what time is.)

We make a mistake when we think of a black hole as a 3 dimensional object. It is actually 4 dimensional. Think of the measurement transformations that take place (e. g. length, mass, & time. For a quick intro see https://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/pogge.1/Ast162/Unit5/gps.html) as you closely approximate the speed of light and/or you are in a very deep gravitational field.
 
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