Can I have laser eye surgery?

Nov 23, 2020
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Hi there,

I'm new to this forum.
I have squints and also has been suffering from shortsightedness. I wear glasses and, at times, lenses. Sometimes wearing glasses causes headaches, and I feel like my eyes are stressed. A friend told me why can't I do laser eye surgery. He said good about laser eye surgery. But he said to me that by forgetting that I have squints. I need to confirm whether a person like me with squints can be a candidate for it or not. Will there be any health problems due to this? Does anyone know about this? Kindly share your views.

Thanks!
 
Mar 4, 2020
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How old are you? 68 here. I went in to get new eyeglasses and was told glasses wouldn't help. Cataracts. Just got both eyes done. I couldn't believe the difference. It's like having new eyes. Just putting standard lens in.....I now have 20/20. But all eyes are different. There is a couple of weeks wait between eyes. So I could compare old eye with new eye.

Looking thru the old lens was like looking thru a dirty yellow cloudy window. And because it comes on slow......I had no idea my eyes were so bad. The new intensity and brightness was uncomfortable at first, but doesn't last long.

Just lay back in a chair, no pain, and it took about 10 minutes. And now.....no squint.

For laser surgery, from what I understand, sculpts the outside lens, and so no external eye correction needed.

That should relieve squint too. The doctor probably goes by his sight measurements, not the degree of squint.

Some squints don't come from bad eyesight.
 
Jan 11, 2021
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How old are you? 68 here. I went in to get new eyeglasses and was told glasses wouldn't help. Cataracts. Just got both eyes done. I couldn't believe the difference. It's like having new eyes. Just putting standard lens in.....I now have 20/20. But all eyes are different. There is a couple of weeks wait between eyes. So I could compare old eye with new eye.

Looking thru the old lens was like looking thru a dirty yellow cloudy window. And because it comes on slow......I had no idea my eyes were so bad. The new intensity and brightness was uncomfortable at first, but doesn't last long.

Just lay back in a chair, no pain, and it took about 10 minutes. And now.....no squint.

For laser surgery, from what I understand, sculpts the outside lens, and so no external eye correction needed.

That should relieve squint too. The doctor probably goes by his sight measurements, not the degree of squint.

Some squints don't come from bad eyesight.
Cataract when left untreated can lead to permanent blindness. We at the The Eye Foundation pave way for perfect vision through our efficient Cataract Eye Surgery. Cost of cataract eye surgery at The Eye Foundation is affordable and deliver great results. Pave way to clear vision with Cataract eye surgery at The Eye Foundation. Cataract is characterized by a painless, progressive decline in vision. Apart from decreasing vision patients with cataract even in the early stages may experience increased glare while driving at night or reading in dim illumination, difficulty in differentiating objects at a distance and the need for frequent change of glasses.
 
Sep 6, 2020
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It was the most wonderful item I've ever bought for myself.
Just to add to the discussion that laser eye surgery is not guaranteed to provide a result (99.2%) and some patients will find their eyesight worsens over times requiring a further procedure.
 
Jan 27, 2020
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Prior to requiring glasses, I had 20/10 vision in both eyes. I was later able to suffer a vegetable matter injury to my left cornea, resulting from a thorn tree. I was also able to get crushed automobile glass in my other eye, which had to be carefully vacuumed out.

My glasses strength was changing quite often and I needed glasses to both drive and read, Lasik®* surgery seemed the best option and I had it done in both eyes about 20 years ago. As a result, my distance vision has returned to 20/10 and I only need common, over the counter glasses to read. I am very pleased that I had it done.

* Lasik Eye Surgery: is the best known and most commonly performed laser refractive surgery to correct vision problems. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can be an alternative to glasses or contact lenses.

During LASIK surgery, a special type of cutting laser is used to precisely change the shape of the dome-shaped clear tissue at the front of your eye (cornea) to improve vision.

In eyes with normal vision, the cornea bends (refracts) light precisely onto the retina at the back of the eye. But with nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia) or astigmatism, the light is bent incorrectly, resulting in blurred vision.

Glasses or contact lenses can correct vision, but reshaping the cornea itself also will provide the necessary refraction.

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LASIK surgery may be an option for the correction of one of these vision problems:

  • Nearsightedness (myopia). When your eyeball is slightly longer than normal or when the cornea curves too sharply, light rays focus in front of the retina and blur distant vision. You can see objects that are close fairly clearly, but not those that are far away.
  • Farsightedness (hyperopia). When you have a shorter than average eyeball or a cornea that is too flat, light focuses behind the retina instead of on it. This makes near vision, and sometimes distant vision, blurry.
  • Astigmatism. When the cornea curves or flattens unevenly, the result is astigmatism, which disrupts focus of near and distant vision.
If you're considering LASIK surgery, you probably already wear glasses or contact lenses. Your eye doctor will talk with you about whether LASIK surgery or another similar refractive procedure is an option that will work for you.

Risks of LASIK surgery include:

  • Dry eyes. LASIK surgery causes a temporary decrease in tear production. For the first six months or so after your surgery, your eyes may feel unusually dry as they heal. Dry eyes can reduce the quality of your vision.
    Your eye doctor might recommend eyedrops for dry eyes. If you experience severe dry eyes, you could opt for another procedure to get special plugs put in your tear ducts to prevent your tears from draining away from the surface of your eyes.
  • Glare, halos and double vision. You may have difficulty seeing at night after surgery, which usually lasts a few days to a few weeks. You might notice increased light sensitivity, glare, halos around bright lights or double vision.
    Even when a good visual result is measured under standard testing conditions, your vision in dim light (such as at dusk or in fog) may be reduced to a greater degree after the surgery than before the surgery.
  • Undercorrections.If the laser removes too little tissue from your eye, you won't get the clearer vision results you were hoping for. Undercorrections are more common for people who are nearsighted. You may need another LASIK procedure within a year to remove more tissue.
  • Overcorrections. It's also possible that the laser will remove too much tissue from your eye. Overcorrections may be more difficult to fix than undercorrections.
  • Astigmatism. Astigmatism can be caused by uneven tissue removal. It may require additional surgery, glasses or contact lenses.
  • Flap problems. Folding back or removing the flap from the front of your eye during surgery can cause complications, including infection and excess tears. The outermost corneal tissue layer may grow abnormally underneath the flap during the healing process.
  • Regression. Regression is when your vision slowly changes back toward your original prescription. This is a less common complication.
  • Vision loss or changes. Rarely, surgical complications can result in loss of vision. Some people also may not see as sharply or clearly as previously.
Certain health conditions can increase the risks associated with LASIK surgery or make the outcome less predictable.

Doctors may not recommend laser refractive surgery for you if you have certain conditions, including:

  • Autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • A weakened immune system caused by immunosuppressive medications or HIV
  • Persistent dry eyes
  • Recent changes in vision due to medications, hormonal changes, pregnancy, breast-feeding or age
  • Inflammation of the cornea, lid disorders, eye injuries or eye diseases, such as uveitis, herpes simplex affecting the eye area, glaucoma or cataracts
LASIK surgery is usually not advisable if you:

  • Have an eye disease that causes the cornea to thin and bulge, or if you have a family history of it
  • Have fairly good overall vision
  • Have severe nearsightedness
  • Have very large pupils or thin corneas
  • Have age-related eye changes that cause vision to be less clear
  • Participate in contact sports that may be associated with blows to the face
If you're considering LASIK surgery, talk to your doctor about your questions and concerns. Your doctor will discuss whether you're a candidate for the procedure or other similar procedures.

See: https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/lasik-eye-surgery/about/pac-20384774

My only downside has been dry eyes for which I use Refresh Tears, as recommended by my ophthalmologist.
Hartmann352
 
Mar 4, 2020
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Heavens to Betsy. I had cataract surgery about 2 years ago. I have had covid twice since then. And with each infection, my eyesight changed. I went in to get a new glasses prescription, and come to find out I have secondary cataracts.

Never heard of it before. Back to the eye surgeon. They say they can repair the problem with a laser and that the problem should not return. Then I can get a new prescription.
 
Mar 4, 2020
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I received my first laser treatment for secondary cataracts this morning. It was quick, easy and painless. They attached a small eyepiece type of lens right on my eyeball with some type of stickum pucky. The doc said it would be a few hrs to wash out. But just going into the lobby when leaving, I saw very sharp and clear thru that eye. I drove myself home.

One to go.

A very un-exspected thing happened, and I wonder if anyone else going thru this has noticed it. Everytime he pulled the trigger on that laser, a very loud audio snap would occur, right between my ears. When finished and out of the cradle, I asked the doc and assistant, if they could hear those snaps. Neither could, and they told me no one had ever mentioned them before. The doc explained to both of us, that the interaction of the laser, causes a small void in my eye fluid. A small drop of vacuum. And when that void collapses, it snaps, and some do hear it internally. He had learned it school, but no patient had ever mentioned it. I was his first to ask.

I was not expecting it, hoped he had his settings right, and wasn't getting a lobotomy.
 

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