Are mathematical rotations how black holes form?

Dec 23, 2019
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A black hole is a coherent math object that is rotating. It is math that causes a problem for the virtual fabric of spacetime. They are just another cyclical event and as such follows the bifurcation diagram that sits at the core of math. Black holes are allowed to happen because it is the way math operates.
It's an object that is only math, it isn't using the spatial dimension. It represents the side of QM physicist refuse to think about.
A black hole likely has a reverse bifurcation diagram going down to a singularly starting under 3.
 
Jan 27, 2020
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A black hole is a coherent math object that is rotating. It is math that causes a problem for the virtual fabric of spacetime. They are just another cyclical event and as such follows the bifurcation diagram that sits at the core of math. Black holes are allowed to happen because it is the way math operates.
It's an object that is only math, it isn't using the spatial dimension. It represents the side of QM physicist refuse to think about.
A black hole likely has a reverse bifurcation diagram going down to a singularly starting under 3.

You speak of a bifurcation diagram which sits at the core of the black hole math. Which bifurcation case are you referring to: limit point, isolators, trans-critical bifurcation, hysteresis or pitchfork? For a clearer understanding of bifurcation, I suggest the following from CalTech: http://www.crossgroup.caltech.edu/Chaos_Course/Lesson13/Bifurcation.pdf

As far as I am aware black holes are the result of astrophysics where the black hole region ß is the set of those spacetime events which cannot send signals to distant observers like us.
 

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