A new coronavirus mutation is taking over the world. Here's what that means.

Jul 10, 2020
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Question: If scientist are using the first genome published by China, will the "new" mutation affect the research on the vaccine?
I don't think the transmissible rate is somethign to take lightly,as bad as the disease seems to attack organs in humans. Maybe that's why the US is so stricken, or at least, ONE reason anyway
 
Jul 10, 2020
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A SARS-CoV-2 variant has taken over the world, but it's not clear whether the coronavirus mutation is highly transmissible or just lucky.

A new coronavirus mutation is taking over the world. Here's what that means. : Read more
Interesting lead article LiveScience:

A new coronavirus mutation is taking over the world. Here's what that means.
and then from the article, second paragraph:

That's the crux of a debate over a mutation known as D614G, which affects the spike protein on the virus' surface. The mutation is not new. It appears in low levels in samples taken from COVID-19 patients as far back as February.

This is one of the reasons I don't have this site at the top or even in the top 10 of my science sites. Great journalism.
 
May 20, 2020
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Be thorough. Mutation is caused by exposure to external forces that mutates any gene. If the mutation occurs when the virus is very active the effect is more likely to make the virus stronger. When the mutation occurs when the virus is in hibernation as in hiding from UV light which kills it the mutation usually make the virus weaker. Viruses that were in the Northern Hemisphere and made their way to the Southern Hemisphere are getting stronger. The same virus that stayed in the Northern Hemisphere are getting weaker. The key is to block borders through quarantine for two weeks of any travelers from the Southern Hemisphere in late September until the vaccine is available.
 
Jul 17, 2020
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I like how most of live science articles end with : 'never mind about an the words we just wrote - keep social distancing' or 'we wrote a lot of words but it's still not proven, not peer reviewed and doesn't mean anything'. You guys just risk making people make their own conclusions this way - by not giving a clear answer what all that means and that's it's not a sure thing yet
 

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