20 amazing women in science and math

Jay

Mar 8, 2020
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Rosalind Franklin deserved a share of the 1962 Watson/Crick/Watkins Nobel Prize and certainly should be on this list!
 
Jan 6, 2020
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What about the lady named Elizabeth whose mathematics helped discover Pluto? She wrote with both hands simultaneously. And also those ladies in NASA who did the maths by longhand before computers?
 
Mar 8, 2020
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Rosalind Frankin is the shining example of white male privilege that so long held women back. How, how, how could she be ignored? Without her, it would have taken at least another year before someone would have realized it wasn't a single helix. And to hold up the Nobels until she died was reprehensible!
 
Dec 2, 2019
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Great article. And yes there are many honorable mentions. The list could be quite long. But a few jump out at me like:

Admiral Grace Hopper - developed 1st high-level programming concepts opening the computer science field

Jocelyn Bell Burnell - the discoverer of pulsars.

Margaret Geller - pioneer in mapping the nearby universes

Katherine Johnson - black mathematician at NASA that computed spaceflight orbits
 
Mar 10, 2020
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I have to agree that many (particularly important) African American women scientists/mathematicians were left off this list. I wouldn't have chosen Mae Jemison, as great as her accomplishments are, she really isn't a scientist or mathematician. When I see these sorts of inclusions of such lists, it smacks of people who really don't know the history of science and mathematics well, so they choose the first African Americans they come across.
 
Jun 11, 2020
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I have to agree that many (particularly important) African American women scientists/mathematicians were left off this list. I wouldn't have chosen Mae Jemison, as great as her accomplishments are, she really isn't a scientist or mathematician. When I see these sorts of inclusions of such lists, it smacks of people who really don't know the history of science and mathematics well, so they choose the fi
My response is: why discriminate?? Are ALL Chinese, Mexican etc. other MEN and women ignored or forgotten, significant scientists not equally important? It's irrelevant where their ancestors lived, their skin color, their gender in fact almost everything but their accomplishments. what might be so is if they had serious impediments they faced and WHO or what it was. The use of African American Black is TOTALLY INAPPROPRIATE, most so described have never even been there or can speak any of the languages, There is nothing that uniquely defines a person as a African black other than IF they came from there and have skin sufficiently darker than some point on the color scale, I'm not referred to as an Irish White despite the Rogers leaving there in the 1600's Despite my speaking the language and having been there, There is only ONE human race: Homo Sapient and yes we come in many different shapes and colors, It's time we started taking this into consideration in not only our speech but our treatment of each other, To specifically choose to speak of the suffering of a group using such irrelevant characteristics such as skin color is irrational what is next, those with blond hair or balding?
 
Oct 4, 2020
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Marie Curie - Albert Einstein, who had been a friend of Curie's, said: "Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted." Perhaps what is most stunning, and rare, about the achievements of Madame Curie are her consistent modesty, selflessness, and generosity. In spite of the fact that she made one of the most important contributions to science and medicine, that she paved the way for women in fields of science and education, and that she did it all under conditions of terrible hardship, she was without pride and desired neither publicity and recognition nor profit. She was not just a great scientist - she was a great benefactor. And her spirit of giving was equally as remarkable as her intellect.
https://www.needforscience.com/chemistry/marie-curie-lady-of-science/
 

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